Museum of Fine Arts

Rouen, France

The musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen was founded in 1801 by Napoleon I. Its current building was built between 1880 and 1888 and completely renovated in 1994. The museum houses a collection of paintings, sculptures, drawings and objets d'art from the Renaissance to the present age, including a rare collection of Russian icons from the 15th to the beginning of the 19th century. The museum's exceptional Depeaux collection, consisting in paintings donation in 1909, places it at the forefront of French provincial museums for Impressionism. The drawings exhibition room houses over 8000 pieces spanning from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

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Details

Founded: 1801
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Athina Kanellopoulou (19 months ago)
A good combination of the museum's collection and temporary exhibitions in parallel.
David Boatman (2 years ago)
Amazing. Very quiet when I visited. Had a room of 10 Monet's all to myself. Friendly staff. Free entry. Really good to visit if you like art and sculpture.
Leo Bekerman (2 years ago)
Awesome way to spend a couple hours. Very underrated gallery - plus, no wait and it's FREE!
Ami Gol (2 years ago)
A nice surprise. The museum is bigger than i thought. it has a variety of paintings and sculptures, from the middle ages to modern. A nice collection of Monet, and also Sisley, Géricault, Delacroix, Caravaggio, Velazquez and many more. Recommended.
Frederic Iterbeke (2 years ago)
Only saw the permanent exhibit. Beautiful collection, from medieval to modern. Emphasis on renaissance (has a Caravaggio and quite some Dutch and Flemish works), French impressionists (a famous Rouen cathedral painting by Monet for example) and other 19-20th century works. Mostly paintings but also some sculpture. Definitely worth a visit if you like art.
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