Château d'Ivry-la-Bataille

Ivry-la-Bataille, France

The original square form castle in Ivry-la-Bataille was built around 960 AD. It was 32x25m wide stone building with a small chapel. Today the first floor of this castle remains and it is the oldest medieval building in Normandy. The castle was enlarged during the next centuries. In the Hundred Years' War it was conquered by English (1418), but moved back to the hands of French (1424). After 1449 the castle was left to decay. The restoration began in 1968.

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Details

Founded: 960 AD
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kias (5 months ago)
Château d'Yvry for a short walk with beautiful views.
roignant juroi@hotmail.com (8 months ago)
Very beautiful panorama and the remains of the medieval castle are well maintained.
Durand Jerome (8 months ago)
Very nice structure if you are interested in medieval architecture. The park is well laid out and the walk is pleasant. A small enhancement of the still covered room could provide a plus.
Aleksey Parkhomchuk (13 months ago)
Good place for leisure.
Helen Clarke (3 years ago)
Not on the tourist trail. Oldest stone built castle in Normandy. Amazing views.
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