St. Aignan Church

Chartres, France

Saint Aignan Church was originally built around year 400, in the era of pre-Romanesque, by the bishop of Chartres - later his name has given as the name of the church. The church is considered as the most ancient parishes in Chartres. In its history, the church has suffered from several times fire in 12th, 13th and in the early 16th century. Most of the church was rebuilt after the latest misfortune in the 16th century.

The main portal in the center of the front facade was the only part of the church that preserved for the new church. The church also suffered several times of change function during the French Revolution - it was once served as a military hospital, then once became a prison and even as a fodder shop. It finally returned as a worship place in 1822.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Сергей Афанасьев (7 months ago)
На фоне Собора м.б. ни так впечатляющие, но для понимания города рекомендую к посещению
vincent achere (8 months ago)
Église du 16 e siècle très intéressante à visiter. Sa fondation remonte probablement au haut moyen age. Saint Aignan est un évêque repris la ville d'Orléans
Defontaine Sylvain (8 months ago)
Très belle église, elle mérite le détour de prendre un temps de prière
HEAVY MOON (10 months ago)
Impresionante iglesia de estilo gótico. Lo más sorprendente es el suelo, mitad madera, mitad mosaicos. Y, sobre todo, la estructura de madera policromada de la techumbre. Para visitar, acudir justo antes de misa, por ejemplo, domingos a las 9
fabienne phibel (11 months ago)
magnifique église de la première moitié du 16 siècle, d une beauté sublime avec de riches charpentes apparentes
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