Musée des Beaux-Arts

Chartres, France

The Fine Art Museum - Musée des Beaux-Arts, is situated just behind the Chartres Cathedral. It was formerly the ancient episcopal palace from the 12th century, where the bishops of Chartres lived.

Some religious sculptures and painting from European School, and other collections of ancient and modern arts are on all year exhibition in the museum.

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Details

Founded: 1833
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Transport Attitude & Vtc (9 months ago)
Très beau site accolé à la Cathédrale de Chartres, à visitez sans modération !
HEAVY MOON (10 months ago)
Curiosa y vistosa capilla. Entrada gratuita y escasa colección artística. Aún así, un buen complemento a la visita de Notre Dame
Steve Wells (12 months ago)
Excellent visit. Free entry but do check what days and times.
Anne-Claire FISCHER (12 months ago)
Un superbe musée d’art assez inattendu dans cette petite ville assez traditionnelle On y trouve logiquement une belle collection d’émaux religieux, mais aussi de l’art africain et des tableaux issus de legs de collections privées Un bon moment garanti tout près de la cathédrale selon moi
MissSJ (13 months ago)
Located at the corner of Jardin de L'Evéché. It was not opened and so we just took some photos.
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