Le Havre Cathedral

Le Havre, France

Le Havre Cathedral (Cathédrale Notre-Dame du Havre) was previously a parish church dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, and is the oldest of the very few buildings in central Le Havre to have survived the devastation of World War II. It became a cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Le Havre in 1974, when the diocese of Le Havre was created.

The belltower dates from around 1520 and the main façade is Baroque. The building was kept unusually low because of the difficulties posed by the unstable ground. The fine church organs were the gift of the Cardinal de Richelieu in 1637, when he was governor of the town.

There is a memorial in the cathedral for the 5,000 civilians who lost their lives during the Nazi occupation of the city in World War II.

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Details

Founded: 1575
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keith Hairs (2 years ago)
Just beautiful,calm and peaceful!
Agora Lee (2 years ago)
Amazing
gokul hariharan (2 years ago)
At Normandy, one of the very few buildings to have survived the bombings in WW2
Afolabi Adefuye (2 years ago)
Fascinating place
Rita Morrison (2 years ago)
Beautiful place with interesting history.
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