Facing the sea, Musée Malraux offers a wide range of paintings from the 17th century right up to the 20th century. The Malraux Museum also houses an important Impressionist collection which was enhanced in 2005 by the Senn-Foulds Collection, one of the finest single collections of Impressionist and Fauvist art.

There are paintings by Claude Monet, Camille Corot, Eugène Boudin (with the largest collection of his works in the world), Eugène Delacroix, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Paul Sérusier and Édouard Vuillard. Modern art is also well represented with works by artists such as Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, Raoul Dufy, Kees van Dongen, Fernand Léger,Alexej von Jawlensky and Nicolas de Staël. There is also an old masters section displaying paintings of Hendrik ter Brugghen, José de Ribera, Simon Vouet, Luca Giordano,Francesco Solimena, Hubert Robert, John Constable and Théodore Géricault.

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Founded: 1961
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

cstr10 (3 years ago)
A little but very diverse exhibition. Lots of Boudin, as well as other modern and even old masters.
pam webb (3 years ago)
Wonderful gallery, very exciting exhibit of nee des vagues. Great time just admiring beauty. Thank you.
Hemkalyan Pandit (3 years ago)
Very very special place.it was such a great feeling to see so many masterpieces in real.specially the impressionism section.The exposition now going on is an amazing collection of sea and nautical related.just amazing experience. Wish I had more time.Great efforts by the curators and the MUMA Team.Thank you so much.
Gabriella Velasco (3 years ago)
I was able to visit this lovely museum for free (under 25), and it was worth that and so much more! Ethereal and aquatic themed art is currently on display. Very cool!
Bill Stitely (3 years ago)
Lovely little museum. Nice collection of impressionist paintings, dominated by Boudin. There was also a social exhibit of art and the sea (my own poor translation of the title). The only reason I graded 4 instead of 5 stars is based on what I had read about the collection. I had hoped for a little more breadth to the collection. Certainly worth the visit, however.
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