Church of Saint-Pierre

Caen, France

The Church of Saint-Pierre (Église Saint-Pierre) was built in the early 13th and the construction continued until the 16th century. The spire was destroyed in 1944, and has since been rebuilt. The eastern apse of the church was built by Hector Sohier between 1518 and 1545. The interior choir and the exterior apse display an architecture that embodies the transition from Gothic to Renaissance.

Until around the mid 19th century, the eastern end of the church faced onto a canal that was then covered and replaced by a road. Various artists and engravers recorded this relation of the church to the canal; for instance, the Scottish painter David Roberts made several very similar views, one of which (dated to c.1830) is in Musée des Beaux-Arts in the Château de Caen.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gilly Cooch (3 years ago)
I seem to recall this is where William the Conqueror is buried well worth a visit
Oana R (3 years ago)
This church is currently in renovation, but it's worth visiting. Very well located in downtown!
MissSJ (3 years ago)
Thanks to the rain that made us stop to take many photographs of the church on the bridge from a distance because we couldn't continue our journey. My friends and I discovered that the church was slightly slanted. Had it not been for the contrast of the darkness, we would not have been able to spot the slanting tower.
Christine Custodio (4 years ago)
Nice to pop in while in Caen. Check the hours if you want to go inside. It's under renovation.
Carl Cencig (4 years ago)
Beautiful architecture. Definitely worth seeing since its right in the downtown core and in front of the chateau.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Augustusburg Palace

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.