Church of Saint-Pierre

Caen, France

The Church of Saint-Pierre (Église Saint-Pierre) was built in the early 13th and the construction continued until the 16th century. The spire was destroyed in 1944, and has since been rebuilt. The eastern apse of the church was built by Hector Sohier between 1518 and 1545. The interior choir and the exterior apse display an architecture that embodies the transition from Gothic to Renaissance.

Until around the mid 19th century, the eastern end of the church faced onto a canal that was then covered and replaced by a road. Various artists and engravers recorded this relation of the church to the canal; for instance, the Scottish painter David Roberts made several very similar views, one of which (dated to c.1830) is in Musée des Beaux-Arts in the Château de Caen.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gilly Cooch (3 months ago)
I seem to recall this is where William the Conqueror is buried well worth a visit
Oana R (6 months ago)
This church is currently in renovation, but it's worth visiting. Very well located in downtown!
MissSJ (8 months ago)
Thanks to the rain that made us stop to take many photographs of the church on the bridge from a distance because we couldn't continue our journey. My friends and I discovered that the church was slightly slanted. Had it not been for the contrast of the darkness, we would not have been able to spot the slanting tower.
Christine Custodio (2 years ago)
Nice to pop in while in Caen. Check the hours if you want to go inside. It's under renovation.
Carl Cencig (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture. Definitely worth seeing since its right in the downtown core and in front of the chateau.
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