Château d'Eu

Eu, France

The Château d'Eu is a former royal residence built in the 16th century to replace an earlier one purposely demolished in 1475 to prevent its capture by the English. The chapel contains the tombs of Henry I, Duke of Guise, and his wife, Catherine de Clèves, who embarked on the construction of the château in 1578. The building was completed almost a century later by the Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier.

Between 1830 and 1848, the château, which had been the property of the Orléans family since its acquisition by La Grande Mademoiselle in October 1657, served as King Louis-Philippe's summer residence. Her Imperial Highness Isabel, Princess Imperial of Brazil, who brought slavery to an end in Brazil in 1888, died at the Château in 1921. Her husband was Prince Gaston, Count of Eu, a grandson of King Louis Philippe I, friend of Queen Victoria.

In 1964, the city of Eu acquired the château, in which, in 1973, it installed its City Hall and created the Musée Louis-Philippe.

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Address

Allée du Cheval, Eu, France
See all sites in Eu

Details

Founded: 1578
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sanne Losekoot (2 years ago)
The history and explanations were given in different languages (French, English, Dutch, German etc). There was a lot to see and the rooms were full of interesting artifacts. Only negatieve point is that there weren't really bedrooms to view
Edouard Ledent (2 years ago)
Exceptional museum with collections extremely well preserved describing life in France across several centuries.
NostalAsie NostaLatina (2 years ago)
Nice museum and building.
Daniel Pineau (3 years ago)
My maternal paternal family goes back at least nine generations living in Eu proper - while my maternal/maternal family was sourced from Corsica in the late 18th century, but, that's irrelevant to this review. What is relevant is that the Chateau has been a backdrop for most of my youthful summers - and some of those in adulthood. American tourists might very well overlook Eu, but it has a rich history - mainly that which includes Guillaume le Conquerant (William the Conquerer) as well as Lorcán Ua Tuathail (St. Laurence O'Toole the Archbishop of Dublin - back in the Norman conquest days). Regardless, the Chateau itself is host to several significant historical events. For Anglophiles, of interest would be Queen Victoria's summer stays in 1843 and 1845 as guest of Louis Philippe. the cost of a self-guided tour is modestly priced. If you're reading this, then you're very likely considering going anyway - so my review is moot. I'll let the photos do the talking. botanists will enjoy the classic French gardens, interior decorators of yesteryear will take interest in the over-the-top interiors. Back in the mid-sixties, the town of Eu took possession of the Chateau. Today, the town hall is situated on the property. If you're visiting the Chateau, it'd be a shame for you not to experience the St. Laurent O'Toole chapel at the top of the overlooking northern hill - as well as the Collegial (what most of you might think of when you think of Cathedrals from the era of Cluny).
Ian Pinfold (4 years ago)
Town centre museum Not sure if it was because we are English or because it was the end if the season but the staff didn't seem too bothered to help & over charged us! Not overly interesting. Grounds weren't very impressive either!
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