Château de La Pommeraye

La Pommeraye, France

The history of Château de La Pommeraye originates from the 11th century. The moat and walls date from the original castle. The castle was rebuilt in 1646 and again in 1850. There is also a 19th century orangerie, chapel and gardens. Today Château de La Pommeraye is a hotel.

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Details

Founded: 1646
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.chateaudelapommeraye.com

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cynthia Mercer (2 years ago)
We stayed at the Chateau for two nights in September of 2018 and the experience was lovely. La Pommeraye is a beautiful French Manor house, out in the Swiss Normandy countryside. The decoration of the house was stunning with art work comfort. The owner was a great host and you got a feeling of being his guest instead of being in a hotel. Very recommended, peaceful luxury, you will not regret it!
Carl Hagarty (2 years ago)
We stayed at this exquisite property for three nights. The accommodations and the architecture were exquisite; the service was impeccable, and the food warranted the highest Michelin rating. Proprietor and gourmand chef, Alexandre Boudnikoff, made our time there one of the best experiences we have ever had anywhere in the world and we would highly recommend it to anyone seeking a refined experience in a serene country setting.
John Hare (2 years ago)
Stunning location, beautifully restored chateau. We had the most marvellous stay in sumptuous rooms. The immaculate accommodation was matched by the friendly welcome. Highly recommended. Already planning a return visit.
Liz Alspector (2 years ago)
We had a wonderful stay at Chateau de la Pommeraye. The chateau is beautifully renovated and decorated - it is clear a lot of love has been put into it. The bathtub in our room was enormous and the perfect way to end a long day touring Mont St. Michel and Granville. Alexandre recommended great restaurants and the breakfasts were delicious, but our favorite meal was the late dinner Alexandre made us after we were delayed due to traffic on our way from Paris to the chateau. Highly recommend.
Sue Newton (2 years ago)
A truely exquisite and immaculate chateau, in peaceful and beautiful countryside. The grounds are equally as stunning as the chateau and Alexandre, the host, is a true gentleman, a wonderful cook (his dinner was superb), and extremely helpful. This place is wonderful for all, couples, friends, families etc., as well as being an amazing venue for a wedding. We wish we could have stayed longer at this beautiful gem.
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