Bayeux Cathedral

Bayeux, France

Bayeux Cathedral is a Norman-Romanesque style cathedral built originally in the 11th century. It was the original home of the Bayeux Tapestry and is a national monument of France. The site is an ancient one and was once occupied by Roman sanctuaries. The present cathedral was consecrated on 14 July 1077 in the presence of William, Duke of Normandy and King of England. It was here that William forced Harold Godwinson to take the oath, the breaking of which led to the Norman conquest of England.

Following serious damage to the Cathedral in the 12th century, the Cathedral was rebuilt in the Gothic style which is most notable in the crossing tower, transepts and east end. However, despite the crossing tower being started in the 15th century, it was not completed until the 19th century. The interior was destroyed during the Wars of Religion in 1562 and restored in 1589.

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