The history of the original estate of Vanajanlinna, Äikäälä, goes back to the Middle Ages. Historical records mention Olle af Aeykaelum (Olli of Äikäälä) as the owner of the Äikäälä estate in 1374. After him the farm has had many owners and a colourful history as a freehold and holding farm used for agriculture.

The actual history of Vanajalinna begins from the year 1918, when the industrialist Carl Wilhelm Rosenlew bought the Äikäälä estate. His idea was to build a hunting lodge for politicians and economical elite of the new, independent Finland. The Vanajanlinna palace was designed by Sigurd Frosterus and it represents baroque, renaissance and British manor architecture styles. The massive red-brick palace was completed in 1924.

After the death of C. W. Rosenlew Vanajanlinna was left for minimal use and in 1941 Rosenlews decided to sell the estate. There were two interested buyers. Risto Ryti, the President of Finland, wanted Vanajanlinna as the President´s summer residence instead of the present official summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali. The other interested was an immensely rich German munitions industrialist Willy Daugs. Despite Risto Ryti´s strong opposition, Vanajanlinna was sold to Daugs, who then moved to the house.

After Germany was defeated in the war, all German property in Finland was transferred to the Soviet Union as war reparations, including Vanajanlinna. The Russian embassy used Vanajanlinna for holiday residence few times, but the main building began to decay. In 1956 Yrjö Sirola Institute acquired the estate and moved it as the folk high school. After the acquisition over a half of the land was conveyed to veterans to build small farms and dwelling houses. The Sirola Institute was shut down in 1994 and in 1996 the buildings and land of Vanajanlinna were acquired by the City of Hämeenlinna.

Today Vanajanlinna provides hotel, restaurant, conference and event services. There is also a high class golf course.

Reference: Vanajanlinna

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Details

Founded: 1924
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.vanajanlinna.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elizabeth Esmy (8 months ago)
Really enjoyed our one night stay. The 3 course dinner was outstandingly tasty! Very beautiful place :) I certainly recommend!
Ari Riikonen (14 months ago)
Ok.
Jan Sandbacka (19 months ago)
An elegant historical castle hotel in a beautiful surrounding. Friendly service and great breakfast. 20 minutes drive from Hämeenlinna city center. A bit more than one hour drive from Helsinki.
Ramon Sadornil Rivera (2 years ago)
Nice place with quite a history and traditions. Food was amazing and staff was helpful. The room had no amenities.
Jani Varjo (2 years ago)
We had apartment in separate building near golf club. Room was really dated and furniture was flea market collection from last decades. In bedroom there were no blinds. Castle itself is a great place to see. Staff was very attentive and positive. Breakfast was mediocre.
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