Vanajanlinna

Hämeenlinna, Finland

The history of the original estate of Vanajanlinna, Äikäälä, goes back to the Middle Ages. Historical records mention Olle af Aeykaelum (Olli of Äikäälä) as the owner of the Äikäälä estate in 1374. After him the farm has had many owners and a colourful history as a freehold and holding farm used for agriculture.

The actual history of Vanajalinna begins from the year 1918, when the industrialist Carl Wilhelm Rosenlew bought the Äikäälä estate. His idea was to build a hunting lodge for politicians and economical elite of the new, independent Finland. The Vanajanlinna palace was designed by Sigurd Frosterus and it represents baroque, renaissance and British manor architecture styles. The massive red-brick palace was completed in 1924.

After the death of C. W. Rosenlew Vanajanlinna was left for minimal use and in 1941 Rosenlews decided to sell the estate. There were two interested buyers. Risto Ryti, the President of Finland, wanted Vanajanlinna as the President´s summer residence instead of the present official summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali. The other interested was an immensely rich German munitions industrialist Willy Daugs. Despite Risto Ryti´s strong opposition, Vanajanlinna was sold to Daugs, who then moved to the house.

After Germany was defeated in the war, all German property in Finland was transferred to the Soviet Union as war reparations, including Vanajanlinna. The Russian embassy used Vanajanlinna for holiday residence few times, but the main building began to decay. In 1956 Yrjö Sirola Institute acquired the estate and moved it as the folk high school. After the acquisition over a half of the land was conveyed to veterans to build small farms and dwelling houses. The Sirola Institute was shut down in 1994 and in 1996 the buildings and land of Vanajanlinna were acquired by the City of Hämeenlinna.

Today Vanajanlinna provides hotel, restaurant, conference and event services. There is also a high class golf course.

Reference: Vanajanlinna

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1924
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.vanajanlinna.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isac the Coolhead (8 months ago)
Beautiful location but not much to do If you are not a golfer. Quite far from Hämeenlinna. Very good breakfast. Very poor Wi-Fi. Room was clean and quiet but temperature could not be adjusted. Like usually, it was too hot to have good sleep. Why do hotels always think that people like to sleep in a sauna! Electrical plugs were in unpractical places.
Lisbeth (11 months ago)
That our room or our bed was not made was incomprehensible and unworldly. We were only there for two nights, but that's really wrong and therefore too expensive!
Oriphia (12 months ago)
One of the most beautiful venues in Finland! Friendly staff and special thanks to the lovely chefs who carefully prepared my dairy free meals. They were seriously goood! Regrettably I'm removing 1 star from the overall score because my room was dated and I found an insect crowling over the pillow just before going to bed ? The bed itself was firm and comfortable though.
Rohit kumar (15 months ago)
One of the best places to go golfing and relaxing at the same time. Super nice golf fields and nature all around. Recommend and will come back.
Lino O (3 years ago)
Neat place, staff was very accommodating. Enjoyed my stay here.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wieskirche

The Pilgrimage Church of Wies (Wieskirche) is an oval rococo church, designed in the late 1740s by Dominikus Zimmermann. It is located in the foothills of the Alps in the municipality of Steingaden.

The sanctuary of Wies is a pilgrimage church extraordinarily well-preserved in the beautiful setting of an Alpine valley, and is a perfect masterpiece of Rococo art and creative genius, as well as an exceptional testimony to a civilization that has disappeared.

The hamlet of Wies, in 1738, is said to have been the setting of a miracle in which tears were seen on a simple wooden figure of Christ mounted on a column that was no longer venerated by the Premonstratensian monks of the Abbey. A wooden chapel constructed in the fields housed the miraculous statue for some time. However, pilgrims from Germany, Austria, Bohemia, and even Italy became so numerous that the Abbot of the Premonstratensians of Steingaden decided to construct a splendid sanctuary.