The history of the original estate of Vanajanlinna, Äikäälä, goes back to the Middle Ages. Historical records mention Olle af Aeykaelum (Olli of Äikäälä) as the owner of the Äikäälä estate in 1374. After him the farm has had many owners and a colourful history as a freehold and holding farm used for agriculture.

The actual history of Vanajalinna begins from the year 1918, when the industrialist Carl Wilhelm Rosenlew bought the Äikäälä estate. His idea was to build a hunting lodge for politicians and economical elite of the new, independent Finland. The Vanajanlinna palace was designed by Sigurd Frosterus and it represents baroque, renaissance and British manor architecture styles. The massive red-brick palace was completed in 1924.

After the death of C. W. Rosenlew Vanajanlinna was left for minimal use and in 1941 Rosenlews decided to sell the estate. There were two interested buyers. Risto Ryti, the President of Finland, wanted Vanajanlinna as the President´s summer residence instead of the present official summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali. The other interested was an immensely rich German munitions industrialist Willy Daugs. Despite Risto Ryti´s strong opposition, Vanajanlinna was sold to Daugs, who then moved to the house.

After Germany was defeated in the war, all German property in Finland was transferred to the Soviet Union as war reparations, including Vanajanlinna. The Russian embassy used Vanajanlinna for holiday residence few times, but the main building began to decay. In 1956 Yrjö Sirola Institute acquired the estate and moved it as the folk high school. After the acquisition over a half of the land was conveyed to veterans to build small farms and dwelling houses. The Sirola Institute was shut down in 1994 and in 1996 the buildings and land of Vanajanlinna were acquired by the City of Hämeenlinna.

Today Vanajanlinna provides hotel, restaurant, conference and event services. There is also a high class golf course.

Reference: Vanajanlinna

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Details

Founded: 1924
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.vanajanlinna.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan Avery (2 years ago)
Grand location and beautiful views
Vanina Heuser (2 years ago)
Great breakfast, very nive place.
Ilkka Hartikainen (2 years ago)
Lovely location and building with great atmosphere and beautiful scenery.
Petteri Hynönen (2 years ago)
Beautiful environment and friendly customer service.
agatha JURGELEVIC (2 years ago)
One of the best places to go golfing and relaxing at the same time. Super nice golf fields and nature all around. Recommend and will come back.
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