The prison museum introduces to the visitors the history of correctional treatment in Finland and the prison life in the past and these days. The most valuable item is the museum building itself with its authentic premises that have been maintained in their original condition since the time when the building still functioned as a prison. The building and the exhibition consist of three floors.

The prison museum functions in the former premises of the provincial prison of Häme. When the building was finished in 1871, it was the first prison in Finland with cells, and it was used until the 1993. The museum was opened to the public in June, 1997. The building was designed by the architect L. I. Lindqvist. The museum features a permanent exhibition and changing exhibitions. For more details, take a look at the museum's calendar of events. Special exhibition: elementary studies in prison. In this exhibition, you can find answers to questions about how and why reading, writing and basic mathematics were taught in prisons. Paid guided tours available only if booked in advance.

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Details

Founded: 1871
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juha Malmivaara (5 months ago)
Mielenkiintoinen museo jossa on helppo poiketa
Ari Kivistö (5 months ago)
Mukava museo kokemus. Hyvä kuvaus H:linnan historiasta.
Mika Kuisma (8 months ago)
Mielenkiintoista tietoa kompaktisti Hämeenlinnan historiasta. Talo on hieno!
Arja Lemetyinen (9 months ago)
Museossa on niin kuuma, että lasten kanssa ei jaksa olla kuin hetken.
Estelle Reynolds (12 months ago)
Contained absolutely nothing. Only a short film of the later history of Hameenlinna. The one star is for the clothes I could try on and take photos. It should be half a star. There were no artifacts of the old town - everything is in storage???!!
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