Armoured Vehicle Museum

Hämeenlinna, Finland

Parola Tank Museum, officially Armoured Vehicle Museum displays various tanks, armoured vehicles and anti-tank guns used by the Finnish Defence Forces throughout its history. A rare exhibit is an armoured train used in World War Two. A few kilometers away from the museum is also the Armoured Brigade. The museum was opened June 18, 1961, when there were 19 tanks and 12 anti-tank guns on display. Also Leopard 2A4, the latest tank in the Finnish Defense Forces is displayed.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: opened 1961
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Lidborg (2 years ago)
Very interesting and worth a visit
MerkkiA (2 years ago)
This is an excellent museum. I recommend anyone who has an interest in Finnish military history to visit here. It covers the complete spectrum on Finnish history with well ordered and thorough displays. I especially like the display of Finnish creativity in tackling seemingly unsolvable issues.
Ruixing Yang (2 years ago)
Nice museum with military weapons and finnish history. Highly recommend.
Robin Bobin (2 years ago)
Nice place inside and outside. Can be interesting for that who knows or is interested in story of swastika in Finland - it used since 1920 in Suomi (Army, Navy, Air Force) and is not "German idea". This is the real history of Finland and just respect it!
Estelle Reynolds (2 years ago)
Very interesting, even for someone who isn't really interested in military matters. The history of Finland was described wonderfully. However, the translations into English seemed to stop on the second floor! Very friendly lady at reception.
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