Château de Vascoeuil

Vascœuil, France

Château de Vascoeuil is a beautiful 15th century castle with a museum and sculpture park in the gardens. A noble house built after the Hundred Years War, the château hosts the museum of Jules Michelet, dedicated to the famous French historian, in one of its outbuildings. Wander around the grounds of the estate, through the typically French gardens, to uncover the sculptures that have been placed amongst the beautiful trees and plants. It is a great place to spend the day with the family.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karl-Heinz Bartels (10 months ago)
Eines der schönsten Schlösser, welches nur der Kunst dient. Sehr schön ist auch der Kaffee-Garten am Bach. Sehr erhohlsame Stunden.
Dave Smith (15 months ago)
Lovely setting. Some great modern art in the form of statues displayed around the grounds and in the lovingly restored chateau. The exhibition within the chateau was not to my taste but that did not detract from our visit. The cascade near the restaurant is beautifully set.
Jason Chappell (15 months ago)
nice place to visit with great sculptures
Gerry Smith (18 months ago)
Main interest is the art. Wide variety of painting and sculpture.
Valeria Casson Moreno (2 years ago)
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