Gedesby Church

Gedser, Denmark

Gedesby church is built with a longhouse in the Gothic style with with pointed arch windows and a Gothic tower base, of brick in monk bond. Originally the church was crown land, that is royal property until 1767, when it along with the main church in Skelby was sold along with the rest of Falster equestrian goods.

The altarpiece of the Dutch wing type from 1573 is pretty and well preserved with a figure rich crucifixion scene. The Chalice is composed of parts from different times, the oldest parts of approx. 1600. The Baptismal basin of brass about 1645. Pulpit from 1600 in Renaissance style. Organ with 5 octaves from Frobenius in 1938. Two epitaphs, both from inn keepers of the Gedesby Inn, which had royal privilier up to the 17th century.

Before reaching into the church, there is the storm surge stone outside a label that shows the water level in the flood the 1872. Add this water level to the included hurricane waves, it's really incredible that everything and everyone was not sea prey.In Gedesby church is a child's coffin at the ceiling waiting to have a child to the grave. The child drowned during the flood in 1872, but was never found. In total 22 people in Gedesby drowned during the flood, and there was made coffins for all of them. But the little girl had disappeared without trace.

The cemetery is surrounded by hedges and walls of split boulders.

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Address

Gedesby 3, Gedser, Denmark
See all sites in Gedser

Details

Founded: c. 1350
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.gedser.net

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Sørensen (21 months ago)
Henning Frantzen (21 months ago)
En lille gammel landsby kirke
Uwe Dieter Heinrich Gehrmann (2 years ago)
Gutes altes Gotteshaus
Rikke Jensen (2 years ago)
Hyggelig flot lille kirke
Leif Wriedt Jørgensen (3 years ago)
Smuk gammel landsbykirke i et historisk stormflodsområde.
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