Landévennec Abbey Ruins

Finistère, France

Landévennec Abbey (Abbaye de Landévennec) was a monastery now in Finistère. It existed from its foundation at Landévennec, traditionally by Winwaloe in the late fifth century, to 1793, when the monastery was abandoned and sold. In 1950 it was bought and rebuilt by the Benedictines of Kerbénéat. It became a Benedictine foundation in the eighth century. It was attacked and burned by Vikings in 913; it was subsequently rebuilt in stone.

Today the abbey museum features an exhibition that examines how excavations are carried out as well as outlining the site’s major developments through history.

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Details

Founded: 482 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mithe Donnard (2 months ago)
J'adore me rendre à L'abbaye de Landévennec rendre visite à la boutique livres et autres articles de toutes sortes un très beau choix....... Puis un passage à la chapelle des moines pour m'y recueillir car il y a un coin privé où le Saint Sacrement est exposé...... C'est un grand bienfait que d'y aller.....
Quiet Night Relaxing (11 months ago)
Landévennec Monastery
A. EIDE (12 months ago)
Perfect getaway from busy tourists sites. A moment of peace
Romuald (2 years ago)
We love visiting such places in Brittany. This one includes a museum, which makes it better.
Robert Voisin (2 years ago)
Magnifique lieu de repos et de ressourcement. Grande Abbaye assez récente et ruines de l ancienne. Une vingtaine de moines y vivent et accueillent des personnes venues chercher le calme dont je fais partie. L envirronnement est magnifique ainsi que toute le region. Un petit port, une eglise et un cimetière typique dans le village. La côte y est splendide. Des secteurs boisés importants et agréables. J ai trouve par hasard un tres charmant petit sentier en impasse en bas de l abbaye et longeant la mer.
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