Landévennec Abbey Ruins

Finistère, France

Landévennec Abbey (Abbaye de Landévennec) was a monastery now in Finistère. It existed from its foundation at Landévennec, traditionally by Winwaloe in the late fifth century, to 1793, when the monastery was abandoned and sold. In 1950 it was bought and rebuilt by the Benedictines of Kerbénéat. It became a Benedictine foundation in the eighth century. It was attacked and burned by Vikings in 913; it was subsequently rebuilt in stone.

Today the abbey museum features an exhibition that examines how excavations are carried out as well as outlining the site’s major developments through history.

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Details

Founded: 482 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Voisin (23 months ago)
Magnifique lieu de repos et de ressourcement. Grande Abbaye assez récente et ruines de l ancienne. Une vingtaine de moines y vivent et accueillent des personnes venues chercher le calme dont je fais partie. L envirronnement est magnifique ainsi que toute le region. Un petit port, une eglise et un cimetière typique dans le village. La côte y est splendide. Des secteurs boisés importants et agréables. J ai trouve par hasard un tres charmant petit sentier en impasse en bas de l abbaye et longeant la mer.
Anne-Claire LE PAGE (23 months ago)
Lieu reposant calme avec une vraie Présence dans un cadre idyllique
Mick Dell (2 years ago)
Il faut absolument visiter cette abbaye. Non seulement pour le site remarquable (la visite guidée est un + +) mais aussi pour le musée très pédagogique et bien agencé.
Dario Veronese (2 years ago)
Arrivati per caso in cerca delle rovine dell'antica abbazia ci siamo immersi in questa atmosfera di pace. Il luogo colpisce per la grande tranquillità e l'assoluto silenzio. Mistico e suggestivo, ispira pensieri profondi e meditazione. Anche se per pochi minuti merita una deviazione dal vostro itinerario.
Christophe PFERTZEL (2 years ago)
This is not criticism, but don't expect some sort of old middle aged building or old monument, the abbey was destroyed and rebuilt a while ago, so it looks more like a modern place. If you're interested, you can share prayers with local monks, they'll welcome you :-)
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