The Tour Vauban (Vauban Tower), initially known as the tour de Camaret, is an 18m-high polygonal defensive tower built to a plan by Vauban on the Sillon at Camaret-sur-Mer, as part of the fortifications of the goulet de Brest. It has three levels and is flanked by walls, a guardhouse and a gun battery which can hold 11 cannons as well as a cannonball foundry added in the French Revolution period.

Drafted in 1683, the tower was designed in 1689 by Vauban and construction was supervised by the military engineer Jean-Pierre Traverse from 1693 to completion in 1696. The 11 cannons in the battery are believed to have been forged with those for the battery on pointe du Grand Gouin, for the Quélern defensive-lines and the many neighbouring batteries. In the French victory in the Battle of Camaret on 18 June 1694, the battery and its two guard houses were only armed with nine 24-pounder cannon and three mortars firing 30 cm balls.

Camaret-sur-Mer is a member of the network of major Vauban sites. Since 7 July 2008 the tour Vauban and 11 other sites have been classed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Founded: 1693-1696
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

R S (11 months ago)
Geocaching
Matthias H (12 months ago)
Great historic buildings, definitely worth a visit. Nice panoramic views.
Ian Walshaw (15 months ago)
Interesting tower constructed by the French Military engineer Vauban. Unlike the others that I have seen that were built by him this one isn't round.
Christian Waagaard (17 months ago)
Totaly usless if you want more then €320 in fule
Lin Murphy (2 years ago)
Just an unusual shaped tower. All fenced off, you're not allowed in. Lovely harbour though and some lovely old boats
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