Quimper Museum of Fine Arts

Quimper, France

The ground-floor halls of Musée des Beaux-Arts are home to some fairly morbid 16th- to 20th-century European paintings, but things lighten up on the upper levels of the town's main art museum. A room dedicated to Quimper-born poet Max Jacob includes sketches by Picasso.

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Category: Museums in France

More Information

www.mbaq.fr
en.quimper.fr

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

World Citizen (2 years ago)
A gem of a museum in a gem of an old town. Beautiful art pieces and quality temporary exhibitions. The Breton art is impressive and there are some larger pieces that are spectacular and well worth the visit just for them. The entry price is also very reasonable at 5 euros which leaves some money for a crêpe after the tour! Plan about 2h for the visit.
Ian Tunbridge (2 years ago)
Punches well above its weight.Consistently good exhibits
steven otten (2 years ago)
Very nicely renovated building, cheap entry but don't expect a half day visit. Only 1,5-2 hour at moderate speed. Exhibition level is fairly high with enough quality to keep you happy.
Ghemma Quiroga (3 years ago)
Excellent exhibition on Odilon Redon at the local museum of Quimper. However, the teacher's pass is not accepted so I had to pay the full price. Staff not very welcoming either.
Tam Mason (3 years ago)
Plan two trips if you are into Breton history through the artists eye. Fantastic exhibitions and well curated spaces.
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