Christiansholm Fortress

Kristiansand, Norway

Christiansholm Fortress was finished in 1672 and formed a part of King Christian IV's plan for defense of Kristiansand when the city was founded in 1641. The architect of the fortress was quartermaster general Willem Coucheron. It was built on an islet, about 100 yards from shore. Today the fortress is connected to the mainland.

The only time the fortress has been in battle was against an English fleet force, lead by HMS Spencer (1800) in 1807 during the Napoleonic Wars. It was decommissioned by royal decree during June 1872 as part of a major redevelopment of fortifications across the nation.

Today, Christiansholm is a tourist attraction by the Kristiansand Boardwalk and venue for a variety of cultural events and festivities. It is now owned by the municipality and is a site used principally for recreation.

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Details

Founded: 1672
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ale Abuelita (13 months ago)
Amazing castle with nice views of the city and home of the kristiandsands tattoo convention.
Kenneth Aitken (13 months ago)
Undergoing some redevelopment at the moment so no access to the building, just the grounds.
hyeonseok yoon (15 months ago)
Beautiful place for a walk.
Joe Billinger (18 months ago)
Interesting if you like history, military, or forts in general. Wish you could go inside, but there is a spiral staircase that lets you look inside. It's free, explore at your leisure. Would be perfect for a picnic.
Keld Thykjær (3 years ago)
Thinking this is an opportunity to see a historical sight. My wife, 3 children and I went to see Christianholm Fæstning. Only to be turned away at the gate being told it is private and used for private parties. Walter of time going here.
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