Christiansholm Fortress

Kristiansand, Norway

Christiansholm Fortress was finished in 1672 and formed a part of King Christian IV's plan for defense of Kristiansand when the city was founded in 1641. The architect of the fortress was quartermaster general Willem Coucheron. It was built on an islet, about 100 yards from shore. Today the fortress is connected to the mainland.

The only time the fortress has been in battle was against an English fleet force, lead by HMS Spencer (1800) in 1807 during the Napoleonic Wars. It was decommissioned by royal decree during June 1872 as part of a major redevelopment of fortifications across the nation.

Today, Christiansholm is a tourist attraction by the Kristiansand Boardwalk and venue for a variety of cultural events and festivities. It is now owned by the municipality and is a site used principally for recreation.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1672
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephen Augustyn (6 months ago)
Fantastic views of the harbour and a very relaxing place to watch the world go by.
Andreas U. H. (9 months ago)
Very nice fortress on the outside, but entrance a bit hard to find. As a conference hall, they desperately need to mount acoustic plates in the roof. Audio quality was really bad with slight noise from the back being a real annoyance. Apart from that it's a really interesting and round locale.
Leif Borø (2 years ago)
Great old fortress! My grandma worked here when it used to be a restaurant. Today it seems to be used for festivals and gatherings of different kinds.
Παύλος Παυλίδης (2 years ago)
A small fortress in a wonderful spot!
Victor Safari15 (2 years ago)
Good place for holidays and visit
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building"s south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena"s dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.