Oddernes Church is the oldest building in Kristiansand from c. 1040. It was originally built of stone and the tower was later made of wood. The chancel has rubble walls and a semi-circular apse. In the 1630s the church was extended by 8 meters after a gift of funds from King Christian IV in connection with a visit in 1635. The money was used for major repairs in the years 1642-1644 and in 1699 for constructing the bell tower. There are three bells in the tower, the oldest from the 13th century.

The organ, altarpiece, pulpit and the tower were all the result of gifts from the first Mayor of Kristiansand, Christen Nielssøn Wendelboe and wife. The pulpit is a classical Baroque. The minstrels' gallery facing the church room along the north side of the church is built in a simple Renaissance style. It has 44 segments with images of prophets, apostles, and allegorical figures.

A new interior was installed in the church in 1788 and was elaborately decorated. The decorations and embellishments of the minstrel's gallery and the walls were covered with brown paint in 1827. In 1927 the paint was removed.

Findings in burial mounds in the area reveal to a settlement dating back to AD 400. It is also believed that there was a royal residence in Oddernes prior to 800. Some historians believe there was once a wooden church or stave church on the site where the present stone church is located.

A rune stone (now located in the porch) that originally stood in the churchyard shows the site has been central to the community even earlier in view of its possible reference to St. Olaf.

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Details

Founded: c. 1040
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Erling Tambs (7 months ago)
Ole Gunnar Skare (7 months ago)
Oddernes kirke er byens eldste bygning med deler av kirken fra det fra det 11. århundret. Jeg synes kirken er vakker og nydelig dekorert. I tillegg til kirken så er her også et kapell hvor de fleste begravelser, bryllup og dåp gjennomføres. Også en pen bygning med et lite og et større kapell etter hvor mange som kommer. Og rundt kirken og kapellet er det en stor og vakker kirkegård med en nydelig minnelund hvor man kan sitte og la tankene vandre. For her er det ro og fred.
Bård (12 months ago)
Synn de ikke klarer å vanne området. Ble ikke gjort før vanningsforbudet heller.
Rigmor E. Galtung (16 months ago)
Oddernes kapell .
Håkon Flåt (2 years ago)
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