Fåvang Stave Church

Fåvang, Norway

Fåvang stave church is a reconstruction of parts of other churches, built 1627-1630. The oldest parts can be dated to c. 1150-1250. Because it has been extensively modified, it is not counted amongst Norways 'real' stave churches. The altar and pulpit are of Renaissance style.

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Address

E6, Fåvang, Norway
See all sites in Fåvang

Details

Founded: 1627-1630
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Torgersen (2 years ago)
A lovely little church. The church was built in the 17th century in half-timbering, among other things from materials from the stave church. Referred to as a stave church, but is not a real stave church. Surrounded by farms, rural area
Det litt spesielle ! (3 years ago)
Cozy wooden church with good attendance from the locals. We were there on the 2nd of Advent 2020, at a service where the main theme was 4 year olds in the village, who each received a songbook from the congregation. Fun to experience the modest 4-year-olds who were called up, and who took part in performing songs for and with those present. We were greeted by 2 popular dogs who walked around the cemetery and welcomed you to Fåvang church.
jan erik rundsveen (3 years ago)
Trust intimate church
jan erik rundsveen (3 years ago)
Trust intimate church
Tore Kløfta (4 years ago)
Good old nice church
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