Ringebu Stave Church

Ringebu, Norway

Ringebu Stave Church was built in the first half of the 13th century. The church is first mentioned in 1270, although it can be older. It was rebuilt into a cruciform church around 1630 by master-builder Werner Olsen and in 1631 received its characteristic red tower. Of the original church only the nave remains, with free-standing posts in the inner area.Later restoration brought it back a bit closer to its original shape in 1921.

The church was painted in 1717, but only the lower half of the walls were done, since the ceiling at that time was lower. At one point the church was painted white within, but during the restoration work in 1921 the church interior was restored to its original colouring.

There have been some archaeological surveys of the ground under the church. The last one took place in 1980 - 1981. These surveys have resulted in the finding of about 900 old coins, mostly from the medieval times, especially from the period 1217 - 1263.

Post holes from an older church has also been found. The post church is assumed to be a forerunner of the stave church. The earth-bound posts of these churches were planted directly into the ground, and therefore they were exposed to humidity which caused them to rot over the years.

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Details

Founded: c. 1220
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Terri Tatarka (21 months ago)
Friend arranged a private visit, this place is a must see...quiet regal beauty.
Šimon Neuholdemaid (2 years ago)
Extraordinary picturesque church in wonderful mountain scenery. But the entry is horrendously expensive for a house of worship.
Peter Lindgren (2 years ago)
Cool to see that an old church like this still stands and is in good condition. Worth a quick visit.
Hanna Wolter (2 years ago)
Beautiful church completely made of wood, looks like from a fairytale. You have to pay an entry fee to go inside, which I would say is not that interesting - the true highlight is the outside architecture which you don't find anywhere else but Norway.
Rebecca Thompson (2 years ago)
Beautiful wooden stage church. Definitely worth the visit, however it was closed at the time when I visited so I couldn’t enter.
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