Garmo Stave Church

Lillehammer, Norway

Garmo stave church originally came from Garmo in Lom in Oppland county. The church is mentioned for the first time in 1363 AD, but is for sure much older, probably built in approximately 1190-1225 AD or even some earlier. It was built on the site of a previous church believed to have been built in 1021 by a Viking chieftain. The church consists of 17th and 18th century inventory with a pulpit from Romsdalen. In 1730, it was expanded into a cruciform church in the timber.

After the new parish church was built in 1879, the stave church was demolished and the materials sold at auction. In 1882, the church was sold to Anders Sandvig, who brought it disassembled to Lillehammer. It was re-erected at Maihaugen in 1920-1921, where today, it is one of the most visited stave churches in Norway.

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Founded: 1190-1225
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

VaP Inbox (3 years ago)
Beautiful open-air museum with historical village, viking wooden church
Zorayda Cocchi (Zorayda Yoga & Wellness) (3 years ago)
Beautiful old style church made entirely of wood.
richard albert (3 years ago)
Reconstructed at Maihaugen in 1921 by architect Heinrich Jürgensen as part of the open-air museum.
SUHAS Dubey (3 years ago)
Garmo stave church is at the top of the hill near the entrance to the Open Air Museum. It is the most striking building at the museum with its pointed tower with dragon heads on the ridges of the roof gazing out to the horizon. The church was built early in the 1200s, but has been extended several times, most recently in 1730. This is when it was given the current characteristic cross shape. The church stood originally at Garmo in Lom. It was pulled down in 1880, but the materials were kept and the church was reconstructed at Maihaugen in 1921. It is placed here as the parish church of the village, and shows what a church looked like in Gudbrandsdalen in the 1700s. It carries history from the middle ages up to the present day. The altarpiece and the pulpit are parts of the church's fittings that carry a message to the congregation through their motifs and symbols. This is where the children of the village were christened and the font still stands in the chancel of the church today. On an August day in 1859, Nobel prize winner Knut Hamsun was christened there. The church was at the centre of festivities such as christenings and weddings, and this is where Christian life was maintained from one generation to the next by the church services. The church was also the gathering place for the village, the only one before the arrival of shops and assembly rooms. This is where agreements were made, the meeting place of the young, and perhaps the fire of love was lit here. The church is in use for services during the summer months and on a Saturday we might find a newly married couple here. During the summer season we can meet the church guide, who can give us the history of the church.
Alisa Hellemose-Hansen (3 years ago)
I've only seen two stave churches in my life. Both were pretty amazing, but this one was ornate inside, with some extensions - lovely.
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