Garmo Stave Church

Lillehammer, Norway

Garmo stave church originally came from Garmo in Lom in Oppland county. The church is mentioned for the first time in 1363 AD, but is for sure much older, probably built in approximately 1190-1225 AD or even some earlier. It was built on the site of a previous church believed to have been built in 1021 by a Viking chieftain. The church consists of 17th and 18th century inventory with a pulpit from Romsdalen. In 1730, it was expanded into a cruciform church in the timber.

After the new parish church was built in 1879, the stave church was demolished and the materials sold at auction. In 1882, the church was sold to Anders Sandvig, who brought it disassembled to Lillehammer. It was re-erected at Maihaugen in 1920-1921, where today, it is one of the most visited stave churches in Norway.

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Details

Founded: 1190-1225
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simona AIG (4 months ago)
Nice place!
Cezary Orlowicz (6 months ago)
Piękny kościół z cmentarzem w cudownej okolicy. Widok jak z bajki
Lee Hoile (15 months ago)
Very interesting ancient church in a wonderful setting. The whole area is worth a visit - full of history.
Angélique L.G. (2 years ago)
Eglise viking en bois debout. A voir
Stine Blankholm Nymo (2 years ago)
Fantastisk flott stavkirke. Guider kan fortelle kirkens historie.
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