Reinli Stave Church

Reinli, Norway

The Reinli Stave Church was built some time during the 14th century. It is the third church at the same location in Reinli. The first references made to a church at this location comes from Olaf Haraldsson who travelled through Valdres in 1023, and also visited Reinli. It is believed that there was a pagan temple at the same location before the first church, some time before 1000.

Through radiocarbon dating, logs in the church have been dated to 1190, which somewhat contradicts previous datings of the church. There are some claims that the church was built after 1326, but this seems to be outside the error envelope of radiocarbon dating. It could be that the church was rebuilt from materials used in an earlier church. There is, however, a written account of the church's existence in 1327.

The Reinli stave church follows a plan set by continental churches in monasteries. Later the church was rebuilt by Sira Thord, who is buried beneath the south-east entrance. The church is generally assumed to be close to its original configuration, although some sources dispute this.

The church underwent interior changes in 1884–1885, and restoration work was done on the exterior in 1976–1977. There is no electric heating or light in the church.

An old pillory stands outside the church, but is no longer in use. On May 17, 1845 its use was formally abandoned when the medieval law was changed.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chelsea Mullen (2 years ago)
Awesome to look at...limited hours. The only one we saw with a Bell tower. Worth stopping bu to walk the grounds if you're in the area
Artemy Orekhov (2 years ago)
Very beautiful and authentic!
Mandy Morgan (2 years ago)
Such a pretty Stave Church, with a lovely knowledgeable lady showing you round. Her very helpful and business savvy grandaugter was selling the tickets. What a team! If I come to Norway again, I would love to return to the church.
Elżbieta Rypulak (2 years ago)
Amazing, unusual, traditional, very old Norwegian church. One of 28 stavkirke, which which still are present in Norway
Lee Schaffert (2 years ago)
Old, but not as old as some others. Lovely setting. You can stroll the cemetery and grounds for free, but there's an entrance fee for the simple tour.
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