Tingvoll Church

Tingvoll, Norway

Tingvoll Church is one of the few remaining old stone churches that was built in Norway. There is some uncertainty as to when it was actually constructed, but records indicate it was between 1150 and 1200. The church is 32 metres long and the steeple and spire (added in 1787) is 36 metres tall. The 1.8-metre thick walls have corridors inside, both on the south side and on the north side. The corridors lead to steep stairs up to the crown of the wall under the rafters and then down again with the same steep pitch. It is a mystery why they were constructed. So also a balcony outside under the gable, located above the chancel. The church is richly decorated. From the painted walls in the weaponhouse, the whitewash paintings inside the nave, to the arc ceiling in the chancel which is adorned with stars and 'half' moons. In the chancel wall, behind the top of the altarpiece, there is a marble rock with runic inscriptions. This inscription contains a prayer and also what is believed to be the name of the constructor - Gunnar. In 1928-1929 the church underwent some restoration work.

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Founded: 1150-1200
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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stig johansen (2 years ago)
Veldig fin steikirke. Verdt å ta turen innom
Ingunn Karijord (3 years ago)
Flott kirke med mye historie inni og utenfor veggene.
Majiin Freddy (3 years ago)
Ingar Gravem (3 years ago)
Ulla Martel (4 years ago)
Vacker gammal kyrka
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