Kulisteinen

Smøla, Norway

Kulisteinen is perhaps the most famous runic stone in Norway. For over 900 years the Kuli stone had been at Kuløy, but then 1913 it was moved to Vitenskapsmuseet i Trondheim. A copy of Kulisteinen was erected in 1969, where the original stone is believed to have stood. Erecting stones as monuments is an ancient pre-Christian custom. Today, we can read on the stone: Tore and Halvard erected this stone for Ulv… Twelve winters had Christianity been in Norway … 

The stone is one of the earliest pieces of evidence of Christianity in Norway. It is also the first time that the name Norway is known to have been used on Norwegian soil. There are various theories about why Kulisteinen was erected, most likely in the 11th century.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Riksveg 669, Smøla, Norway
See all sites in Smøla

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hohenwerfen Castle

Hohenwerfen Castle stands high above the Austrian town of Werfen in the Salzach valley. The castle is surrounded by the Berchtesgaden Alps and the adjacent Tennengebirge mountain range. The fortification is a 'sister' of Hohensalzburg Castle both dated from the 11th century.

The former fortification was built between 1075 and 1078 during the Imperial Investiture Controversy by the order of Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg as a strategic bulwark. Gebhard, an ally of Pope Gregory VII and the anti-king Rudolf of Rheinfelden, had three major castles extended to secure the Salzburg archbishopric against the forces of King Henry IV: Hohenwerfen, Hohensalzburg and Petersberg Castle at Friesach in Carinthia.