Tromøy Church

Færvik, Norway

Tromøy church was originally a Romanesque stone church built around 1150. The church was reconstructed to a cruciform church between 1748-1758, and today this fabulous church is one of Arendal's oldest sights. The church is an old seamark, and due to the unsheltered location, the church is without a tower. The interior of Tromøy church is beautiful. There are wood carvings and painted interior from the 1750s, restored in 1926-1939. Several details in the church are worth mentioning, like the baptismal font made of soapstone from the 14th century, and candlesticks made of brass from 1660.

Important people were buried inside the church in the Middle Ages, both in the choir and in the nave. The tombs had large gravestones in the church floor. It has been illegal to bury people inside the church since 1805, and the large gravestones were moved outside during the restoration in the 1750s. They are now visible along the churchyard wall in the west, together with boulders from Tromøy.

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Details

Founded: 1150
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ronald Werner (3 years ago)
Nica old church at a surprisingly remote location.
Knut Koppang (4 years ago)
The world's most beautiful church!
Tom Angell Øyen (4 years ago)
The finest island in Southern Norway ??
Kenneth Skorstad (6 years ago)
Frank Jensen (6 years ago)
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