Hattuvaara Tsasouna

Ilomantsi, Finland

Tsasounas are small Orthodox chapels in Carelia and the Russian side of the border. They are typically simple wooden buildings with lot of decoration. The tsasouna of Hattuvaara, built in the 1790s, is the oldest still used tsasouna in Western Europe. During the World War II heavy battles were fought in Hattuvaara, but the tsasouna survived with no damages.

In tsasouna´s yard, there is also a museum outbuilding and an old cemetery. There you can find e.g. a monument of Arhippa Buruskainen, famous poem singer, who lived in 1781-1846. Road of Poem and Border (Runon ja rajan tie) passes by the tsasouna just behind it. The tsasouna open to the public in July.

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Details

Founded: 1790s
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.taistelijantalo.fi

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