Munkeby Abbey Ruins

Levanger, Norway

Munkeby Abbey was founded sometime between 1150 and 1180, and was the most northerly Cistercian foundation in the world. Possibly, like Hovedøya Abbey and Lyse Abbey, Munkeby's foundation was carried out by English monks. In 1207, Tautra Abbey was founded, and, either then or at some later point in the 13th century the community and assets of Munkeby were transferred to the new foundation, of which Munkeby then became a grange.

An attempt to re-establish it as an independent house in the 1470s failed. The church however continued in use as a parish church until 1587.

Local tradition had always maintained that Okkenhaug Chapel had once belonged to a monastery; for centuries historians dismissed this, until in 1906 a letter dated 1475 from Pope Sixtus IV to Abbot Stephen of Trugge was discovered in the Vatican archives referring to the request for the restoration of the site as a functioning monastery.

Norway accepted the Protestant Reformation and officially became a Luteran kingdom in 1537. All Catholic religious houses were then seized and declared to be Crown property. This was true of Munkeby.

There are substantial remains of the simple church, built of stone, although it was used as a quarry, but the monastic buildings, built of wood, apparently succumbed to fire in 1567. The site was acquired by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments in 1967. No full archaeological investigation of the site has been carried out, but many partial excavations have taken place, including test excavations in 2000, none of which able to discover significant remains of the monastic buildings, although there is no doubt that they were located on the south side of the church.

In 2007, the now-Trappist Abbey of Cîteaux in France decided to establish a new Cistercian monastery at Munkeby, the first new foundation directly from the very first house of the Order in 500 years. A monastery was built and four monks took residence there in 2009. The new monastery is situated about 1.5 kilometres from the medieval ruins. They now form a companion community to the Trappistine nuns who have re-settled the site of the former Tautra Abbey. The name of the modern house is simply Munkeby Mariakloster.

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Details

Founded: 1150-1180
Category: Ruins in Norway

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rune Salater (2 years ago)
Flott beliggende kirkeruiner med flott historiebeskrivelse. God tursti for de som ønsker en spasertur. Gode parkeringsmuligheter, samt toalett . Verd et besøk
Minh Hoang Tran (2 years ago)
Dette sted er stille og flott for å besøke med fine naturen lanskap,man kan gå lange vei hit fordi man trenger stillhet og helt slapp av for seg selv også tenker på det livet man har opplevd.
Ismael Sola (2 years ago)
Sitio muy pintoresco, las ruinas de la iglesia tienen su encanto. Tiene aseos, mesas de picnic y barnacoa. Desde parten un par de rutas de senderismo en paralelo a un río que a su vez son sendas de peregrinaje bien señalizadas.
Menatko Smrekove (2 years ago)
Nice place
Jan Henryk Wachala (2 years ago)
Ruiny klasztoru .W odbudowie .
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