Hegra Fortress is a small mountain fortress built between 1908–1910 as a border fort as a defence against the perceived threat of a Swedish invasion. After the 1905 dissolution of the union between Norway and Sweden, the Norwegian military harboured continued fears of a Swedish invasion to retake Norway.

The fort's guns came from the dismantled Ørje Fortress in Marker. The artillery was made up of flat angle guns with a range of 6 to 9 kilometres. The fortifications themselves consisted of 300 metres of halls and tunnels dynamited into the mountain at Ingstadkleiva, as well as trench systems and gun positions excavated from the rock with explosives. There are two main underground parallel tunnels of around 80 metres length, with a 35-metre tunnel connecting them at a straight angle. One of the main tunnels served as crew quarters while the other was in direct connection with the above ground artillery pits. The fortress' artillery consisted of two 7.5-centimetre and four 10.5-centimetre positional artillery pieces in half-turrets placed in pits dynamited from the rock and lined with concrete, as well as four Krupp M/1887 field guns.

During the period 1910 to 1926 the fort was used as a major military base for the Trøndelag border areas with Sweden. In 1926, Ingstadkleiva Fort was put in reserve as part of the post-World War I defence budget cuts. From 1934–1939, the deactivated fort was used by the Norwegian Red Cross's youth branch as a summer holiday camp for children. In late 1939, Finnish soldiers of the independent Lapland Group who had crossed the Norwegian border into Finnmark escaping the fighting in the Petsamo district in northern Finland were interned at Ingstadkleiva Fort. All the Finns were repatriated during the early days of 1940. During the Finnish internees' stay a sauna was constructed at the fort's camp.

In 1940, from 15 April to 5 May, Hegra was attacked by the German invaders. During the first week the attacks consisted of two infantry assaults; however in the last two weeks attacks mostly featured heavy artillery fire and Luftwaffe bombing, as well as aggressive patrolling. During the siege large portions of the fort were covered in snow, and as all plans of the fort were stored in German-occupied Trondheim several sections of the fortifications were not discovered by the defenders before the 5 May surrender.

After the end of the Second World War, Hegra Fortress was returned to Norwegian control and is today used as a museum with exhibitions detailing the fort's history with an emphasis on the 1940 siege. There is also a café and a souvenir shop. The museum is often used for conferences and for seminars on issues of war and peace. Hegra Fortress is still owned by the Norwegian Defence Force and financed through the Norwegian Ministry of Defence.

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Founded: 1908-1910
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

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Benedicta Kiplesund (18 months ago)
Recommended mountain fortress with underground tunnels to see in Stjørdal. Located just around 45 minutes from Trondheim. Parking area, toilett, benches, museum, cafetaria (at the moment close) are available. Guide by request. Make sure to take a picture over the sitemap near the parking area so it will be easier to check the number and the place inside the fortress. Try to get up to tower nr. 8. Inside the tunnel it can be chill, especially inside the lounge room. Free entrance to the fortress.
Erlend (2 years ago)
Hegra fortress is a WW2 fortress. It's open for the public, which is great. You can walk around freely and explore the grounds. What I miss are more plaques with stories and facts, but other than that it's great. Be mindful that the road up to the fortress is steep and narrow.
Eija Saranpää (2 years ago)
Interesting place. We left caravan down, which was right decision. Cafeteria with lunch on sundays.
Daniel Enhörning (2 years ago)
Really impressing place. Everything can be explored and the atmosphere is breath taking
Kay Durga (2 years ago)
Hegra Fortress takes you back in time. You can marvel at the length the Norwegian went through to protect and save their country from intruders. ???
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