Nizhny Novgorod Kremlin

Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

The first attempt to replace the wooden fort on the stone Kremlin in the historic city center of Nizhny Novgorod refers to 1374, but construction limited to only one tower, known as the Tower of Dmitrov (not survived to our time). Under the rule of Ivan III, Nizhny Novgorod plays the role of guard city, having a standing army, and serves as a place of military gathering troops on Moscow"s actions against Khanate of Kazan. In order to strengthen the defenses of the city, again begin the construction works of the walls.

Beginning of construction of the stone Kremlin of Nizhny Novgorod became the building in 1500 in the coastal town of Ivanovo Tower, but the main work unfolded in 1508 and in the short term to 1515 a grandiose building was completed. Cause of destruction of the old fortifications, oak walls, was a huge fire in 1513. Two-kilometer wall reinforced by 13 towers (one of them - Zachatskaya - on the shore of the Volga, not preserved). 'Stone City' had a permanent garrison with solid artillery weapons. With the fall of Kazan, Nizhny Novgorod Kremlin lost its military significance, and later it housed the city authorities, principalities, and provinces.

Today 12 of the 13 towers have preserved. In the Kremlin were many churches, but to date, leaving only Michael the Archangel Cathedral, built no later than the middle of the 16th century and rebuilt in 1628-1631, the oldest surviving building in the Kremlin. The cathedral is the tomb of Kuzma Minin. In 1828, in front of the Archangel Cathedral was constructed the obelisk in honor of Kuzma Minin and Dmitry Pozharsky (architect Melnikov and Martos).

In 1837-1841 was built the house of the military governor (now the building is the Museum of Art), in 1840-1843 at the direction of Nicholas I, was built the Arsenal. In 1931, in place of the Transfiguration Cathedral was built the House of Soviets, now the building is City Council.

In 1965, near the obelisk of Minin and Pozharsky was lit the Eternal Flame and created memorial complex in honor of Nizhny Novgorod citizens who died in World War II.

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Details

Founded: 1500
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pranav Nakhare (16 months ago)
The level of preservation of the old days is good and also has a small museum in one of the walls. A good place to explore since it’s big.
Prem Anand (17 months ago)
At Kremlin River Volga & Voka rivers meeting point .Awesome view !
Xaltotun Great (2 years ago)
Not particularly interesting. A lot of historical sites, the mayor's office and the local parliament. Clean and tidy. Looks unimpressive.
Natalia Severini (2 years ago)
Do not ever waste your time in this hell hole of a town. I was forced to go to a world cup match there and how I wished the fixture was different! Absolutely nothing to offer and highly inconvenient. Avoid at all cost
Anthony Gonzalez (2 years ago)
Pretty amazing. The views are really nice. It overlooks the Volga and Oka Rivers. The museum's are cheap and easy to get through. You will have a great time here. Walking around it at night is also fun. Have fun here!
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