Szczecin Cathedral

Szczecin, Poland

The Cathedral Basilica of St. James the Apostle was built by the citizens of the Szczecin city and modeled after the Church of St. Mary in Lübeck. It is the largest church in Pomerania and for many years after the reformation was part of the Pomeranian Evangelical Church, but since World War II and the handing over of Stettin to Poland it has been rebuilt as a Roman Catholic cathedral.

The church was established in 1187 and the Romanesque-style building was completed in the 14th century. One of its two towers collapsed during a storm in 1456 and destroyed part of the church. Reconstruction lasted until 1503 and the entire church was remodeled based on a single-tower hall church design.

The church was destroyed again in 1677 during the Scanian War and rebuilt between 1690 and 1693 in the Baroque style. In 1893, the church was remodeled again however, the west tower collapsed during a storm in 1894 and had to be rebuilt. This remodeling was completed in 1901 leaving the church with a spire of 119 meters.

Air raids on the night of 16 August 1944 during World War II resulted in collapse of the spire added in 1901 and extensive damage to other parts of the building. The north wall, all altars and artworks inside were destroyed by the bombs and ensuing fire. Following the war, government officials were reluctant to allow reconstruction of the church however, a heritage conservator pointed out that demolition of the remaining structure would be more costly than rebuilding it. In 1971, work began on the church and continued for three years. The north wall was reconstructed in a modern style which did not harmonize with the rest of the building and the tower was stabilized, but the spire was not rebuilt. Instead, the tower was capped with a short hip roof or pyramid roof resulting in a height of 60 meters.

In 2006, another renovation commenced which saw new heating systems and flooring installed. Organs, to replace those removed before the World War II bombing and never recovered, were constructed and the tower was strengthened so it could support a redesigned spire. In 2010, a new, neo-baroque Flèche has been constructed. Today, the church serves as the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Szczecin.

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Aramina said 5 years ago
Cathedral makes a big impression, and certainly this is one of the monuments of Szczecin, which necessarily must see. At the same time, without a doubt, it is worth to taste the local dishes, like the delicious goose, reported in the aforementioned Dana Hotel :)

Gina said 5 years ago
Certainly in Szczecin we can find much more so monumental buildings, like the Castle of the Pomeranian Dukes. I love the city for such monuments and places like the Dana Hotel, where you can perfectly relax and taste the unique cuisine of autumn menu.


Details

Founded: 1187
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maja Nowalinska (2 years ago)
Beaitifulll
jiveeei (2 years ago)
Nice view
Ali Tuna Yükselgüngör (3 years ago)
Catedral has a good architecture and the tower has magnificant view of all Szczecin. Must see for once
Andreas Alexis (3 years ago)
Don't miss the view from the church tower!
Luxor Liric (3 years ago)
One of local attractions. Well located. Interesting architecture but the interior is simple. Nice views from the top but I am giving low score two stars review because of very bad customer service that should be improved. The staff rudness and unacceptable behaviour is the big minus. Not once I felt shame in front of tourists having such experience. Tourists complaints is quite frequent. The elevator fee is overpriced. The person in charge has no humility in his approach and I do recommend instead of judgement and bringing unnecessary side subjects while commenting reviews, better to receive comments with understanding and reflect on these feedbacks and then to improve what was pointed. Too many tourists share their disappointment regarding to customer service. Actually people who leave review offer their time and attention in order to help. That should be appreciated and used to improve the service. The person in charge replies expression exposes rudness and inappropriate behaviour especially in such religious place. I guess that's why staff follows same poor standards. Hopefully one day tourist will be treated with dignity.
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