The Church of St. Michael

Keminmaa, Finland

Keminmaa old church is northest medieval church in Finland (built in 1520-1553) and one of the latest ones built before Reformation.

The paintings on the ceiling depict the sufferings of Christ; they date from 1650. The pictures of saints on the walls, the baptismal font and the holy-water font date from the Catholic times. The bier and stocks located in the church porch as well as the black pew standing inside the church itself remind us of the old parish tradition.

The fame of the Old Church of the Parish of Keminmaa is mostly based on the Lutheran priest, Nikolaus Rungius. He was the vicar of Kemi church during the Thirty Years War. Nikolaus Rungius died in 1629 and he was buried under the church in the tradition of the times.

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Details

Founded: 1520-1553
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

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5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko M (12 months ago)
Suomen pohjoisin keskiaikainen kivikirkko, jonka tarina on varsin mielenkiintoinen. Mielenkiintoisin tarina liittyy luterilaiseen pappiin, Nikolaus Rungiukseen, joka toimi 30-vuotisen sodan aikana Kemin kirkkoherrana. Nikolaus Rungius kuoli vuonna 1629 ja hänet haudattiin kirkon kuoriin lattian alle, niin kuin monet muutkin hänen aikalaisensa. Rungiuksen lahoamaton ruumis on edelleenkin nähtävänä kirkon tiloissa. Rungiuksen tiedetään sanoneen: "Jos minun sanani eivät ole tosia, niin ruumiini mätänee, mutta jos ne ovat tosia, niin se ei mätäne." Jokainen voi itse käydä toteamassa, miten on.
Kurssit PRUK (13 months ago)
Jane Fagerström (16 months ago)
Upea vanha kirkko, joka tunnetaan muumiostaan, jonka näin ensimmäisen kerran 1980-luvulla: Se jäi mieleen. Kesällä 2017 kirkon ympärys rehotti jokseenkin villin näköisenä, mysteerisenä.
Rob Davis (17 months ago)
Lovely little 400 year old church just outside of Kemi. Worth a look in you're in the area.
Emerson S. (19 months ago)
Very interesting church, full of History and well conserved, worth a visit.
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