The Museum of Central Finland

Jyväskylä, Finland

The Museum of Central Finland specializes in cultural history. It serves both as the town museum of Jyväskylä and the provincial museum of Central Finland. A large exhibition spans in a most illustrative way the town's history from the 1830s until today. This permanent display is situated on the third floor. Another basic exhibition can be found on the second floor. It is titled Central Finland - past and present and it tells the history of Province of Central Finland from prehistory to our time. In addition to these, the Museum offers changing exhibitions with themes related to cultural history. Displays of art are also on the Museum's programme.

Reference: Official website

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Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Pajunen (9 months ago)
Aalto cafe on Jyväskylän paras lounaspaikka. Museo on maailman paras Aaltomuseo.
Vasilii Aleksandrov (17 months ago)
Attention, the museum is temporary closed because of reconstruction. The end date is unavailable.
Räsänen Kirsi-Marjaana (2 years ago)
Ihana paikka. Todella tunnelmallinen ja viehättävä. Myymälässä hyvät valikoimat historiaan liittyviä kirjoja ja kortteja. Nähtävyys!
Mikko M (3 years ago)
a good place to check some history
Pasi Moilanen (3 years ago)
Easy to visit when visiting Alvar Aalto museum. Interesting view to art of region.
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