The Verhildersum borg dates from the 14th century. It was destroyed in both 1400 and 1514 by the inhabitants of the city Groningen. However, in between these two battles no mention of the borg is made in official records. In a document mention is made of the reconstruction of the borg after 1514 for the sum of 1200 gold pieces, excluding some exterior buildings.

After the death of the inhabitant Aepke Onsta in 1564, Ecke Claessen is mentioned as the inhabitant of the borg in 1576. Complaints by him are made with regard to troubles caused by billeted soldiers with their two wives and a child, who reside at the borg due to the Eighty Years' War.

Around the borg lies the Verhildersum Estate of 32 hectares. In the borg gardens are a carriage house, a farmhouse, and a garden shed. The schathuis was built originally built in 1833 on the estate of Saaksumborg, a borg which is now demolished. The schathuis used to be a farmhouse and derives its name from the old Frysian word skat, which means cattle. In 1972, the schathuis was moved to the Verhildersum Estate.

The late 19th-century garden shed is the former 'tramhouse' of the Emmaplein in Haren, Groningen. The borg garden is laid out according to the golden ratio with characteristics from the Renaissance and the Baroque. The garden is also home to a herb garden, more than ninety types of roses and fifty types of Clematis. The garden is surrounded by moats.

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Address

Wierde 42, Leens, Netherlands
See all sites in Leens

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia Sturgeon (2 years ago)
Beautiful wine beautiful setting fabulous staff z
wilfred stijger (2 years ago)
The place is wonderful! The app for kids dough is horrible ! They now only look at a screen and not at the wonderful artifacts! the Garden is awesome with beautiful bronze sculptures! Overall there is enough education available for everyone.
Geoffrey Stockdale (2 years ago)
A beautiful house and gardens that feels lived in. A warm welcome and good reastaurant.
Sardar Ajbekovich (2 years ago)
A nice place to visit in addition to DooZoo. Personally, I like the garden with sculptures much more than the castle. For the best experience, visit it on a sunny day and finish the visit with a coffee and a cake.
F.W. Wubs (2 years ago)
I came through during a cycle tour from Groningen. There is free entrance to the garden, which is large and nicely decorated with sculptures. The mansion gives a nice insight on the life in former days here. Nowadays also a neighbouring farmhouse has become part of the premises. Here one can learn a bit on farming in the present past in this area. There are several spots were the worn out traveler/biker can refuel.
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