Ehrenfels Castle was (re-)built about 1212 at the behest of the Archbishop of Mainz as a defensive work against the constant attacks by Elector Palatine Henry V, who, as Imperial vicar of Franconia, strived to cut down the archbishop's reach. Mainz staffed the castle with Burgmannen and erected a customs post controlling the shipping on the Rhine, supplemented by the Mouse Tower below at the river. Heavily damaged in the course of the Thirty Years' War, the castle was finally devastated by French troops under the command of Lieutenant General Nicolas Chalon du Bléduring the 1689 Siege of Mainz.

The ruin can be reached from Rüdesheim via a hiking trail through the vineyards. The interior however can only be visited in guided tours by prior appointment.

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Details

Founded: 1212
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Wyatt (9 months ago)
Very cool place, they have a cable car
Shane Vandecar (11 months ago)
It's a bit of a hike to reach these old castle ruins near a bend in the Rhine river, but totally worth it. I've visited three times and never seen anyone else here! Quite, secluded, and beautiful. Different from most of the other Rhine valley castles and palaces I've seen. I recommend parking in Rudesheim and biking through the vinyards to reach it.
Simon Traberg-Larsen (12 months ago)
I can truly recommend the wonderful trip/hike/bike tour from Rüdesheim am Rhein to this ancient castle. The view across the Rhein is marvelous and riding between the thousands of wine stocks, where locals work on the fields really adds to the experience.
Mike Branum (14 months ago)
So, it appears someone is actively restoring this castle. You can drive right up to it and there are some great photo opportunities, but do NOT expect to get within the walls of the ruins as the entrance is behind a locked (fairly newly-installed) gate.
Jens Thomas (2 years ago)
Great views of the ruins from the river. This is such a wonderful area. Even if one doesn't want to hike in the hills, one can see it all from the comfort of a ship.
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