The oldest part of the St. James parish church is the tower chapel (10th century) with two compact columns and cube-shaped capitals (Chapel of Grace today). The church was erected in the 12th century as the result of a vow made by Engelhard Brömser who had promised to build a church if he returned home safely from his captivity by the Moors. The Gothic hall church from the 14th/15th century is also a gift from the Brömser family. It was completely renovated in 1719. In 1766 a 'pigtail helmet' (onion tower) was added to the Romanesque church tower and a Baroque high altar was installed. An ambitious expansion of the parish church was carried out in 1913-1914. On 25 November 1944, the church was almost completely destroyed during a heavy bomb attack. Immediately after World War II, work began to rebuild the church as a hall church incorporating the preserved old parts. St. James' Church was consecrated in 1955.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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