Susiluola (Wolf Cave) is a crack in the Pyhävuori mountain. The upper part of the crack has been packed with soil, forming a cave. In 1996, some objects were found in the cave that brought about speculations that it could have been inhabited in the Paleolithic, 120,000 to 130,000 years ago. These objects, if authentic, would be the only known Neanderthal artifacts in the Nordic countries. However, there is disagreement as to whether Neanderthals actually settled in the cave.

Archaeologist have found about 200 artifacts, some 600 pieces of strike waste, scrapers and bolt stone, and heated stones from an open fire. The objects are made of various materials, including siltstone, quartz, quartzite, volcanic rock, jasper and sandstone; as siltstone and quartzite don't occur naturally in the area, at least some of these must have come from elsewhere.

The ground in Wolf Cave consists of at least eight layers, of which the fourth and the fifth are the geologically and archeologically most interesting. The stone material that has been found appears to have been worked with several different techniques - tools of stone with good processing structure, such as fine-grained quartzite and red siltstone, have been worked in a way that is typical of the Middle Paleolithic, probably from the Mousterian era, while quartz, other quartzite, and sandstone have been worked with the earlier Clactonian technique.

Large quantities of bones from mammals and their prey have also been found, mostly in the upper layers of the cave, though it is not certain that any of the bone material dates from before the last ice age.

Due the research work and falling boulders the public does not have access into Wolf Cave, but there is a walking trail about 1 kilometre long from the Tourist Center to Wolf Cave. The trail takes you past a rock garden, a bronze-age burial site and a "devil's field" (a moraine). The Wolf Cave Tourist Center is located on Paarmanninvuori hill in Karijoki, about two kilometres from the downtown area of Karijoki in the direction of Kristiinankaupunki. The Wolf Cave Tourist Center is open daily during the summer months.

References: Wikipedia, official web site

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Details

Founded: 120,000-130,000 B.C.
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Finland
Historical period: Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Age (Finland)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sari Nevalainen (15 months ago)
Hieno luola, vaikkei sisään tietenkään päässyt. Valaistu! Hyvät opasteet ja kirkolla opastuskeskus. Näköalatornille oli opastus, paikan päällä vielä pöytäryhmä ja roskis. Maisemallisesti hieno polku paikan päälle.
Markus Mikkola (15 months ago)
Hieno paikka mutta näkötorni on matala.
Pasi Mäenpää (15 months ago)
Susiluola on ainutlaatuinen luola, josta on löydetty argeologisia löytöjä ajalta ennen viimeisintä jääkautta. Harmi, ettei luolaan pääse sisään, mutta verkkoaidan takaa saa hyvän kuvan luolasta. Luolassa on napilla syttyvät valot!
Jari Sundman (16 months ago)
Hieno, hyv7nmerkitty alue, jossa paljon katseltavaa.
Tuija Harjunen (18 months ago)
Mielenkiintoinen nähtävyys!
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