The Church of Ulrika Eleanora

Kristiinankaupunki, Finland

The first wooden church of Kristiinankaupunki was built between 1654 and 1658 on the site where the Ulrika Eleonora Church now stands, however it burned down on 16th June 1697. The building of the Ulrika Eleonora Church, which replaced it, was completed in 1700. The church was renovated and returned to use in 1965. The wooden church is a typical seaside church complete with a votive ship hanging from the ceiling. The ship building skills are also otherwise evident in the architecture of the church, for example in the ceiling structure. Outside the church is an old graveyard where the significant families of the city are buried. This churchyard also holds the graves of warriors of Kristiinankaupunki. Only a few services are held in the church each year. Ulrika Eleonora is a popular venue for summer weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1700
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

More Information

edu.krs.fi

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Licht Korn (2 years ago)
Eine der schönsten Kirchen die wir auf unserer Tour gesehen haben. Unbedingt Mal anschauen.
Bo Nylen (2 years ago)
Vesa Savolainen (2 years ago)
Kristiinankaupungin ehdoton nähtävyys, vanha Ulrika Eleonoran kirkko. Kirkko kuuluu kaupungin vanhimpiin rakennuksiin. Se on rakennettu vuonna 1700. Aiemmin paikalla ollut kirkko paloi vuonna1697 salaman sytyttämänä. Tämä pieni kirkko on hyvin kaunis ja kesäpäivänä se suorastaan hehkuu väreissä. Myöskin kirkkopiha on erityisen kaunis ja hautakappeli sopii pihapiiriin erittäin hyvin muodostaen suljetun piha-alueen. Vanha kiviaita myöskin suojelee tämän karun kauniin kirkon sisäpihaa. Suosittelen tätä kirkkoa kesäisenä tutustumiskohteena lämpimästi. Ehdottomasti Kristiinankaupungin suosituimpia turistikohteita.
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Vanha kirkko ja ympäristö jätetty kauniisti muuttelematta ja hyvinkin vanhassa kuosissa jossa näkyy hyvin ajan patina.
Jesse Wirkkala (3 years ago)
Kaunis vanha puukirkko.
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