Bourglinster castle is first mentioned in 1098 as belonging to St Symeon of Trier. At the time it had a residential keep, a chapel and a wall. During the second half of the 14th century, the chapel was extended and a tower was added on the northern side. The lower castle with a moat and two defensive towers was built in the 15th century. Both castles were partly destroyed during the 16th century wars (1542–1544) but were soon repaired and a Renaissance wing was added (1548).

Parts of the lower castle were again destroyed by the French in the 1680s. In the early 18th century, a Baroque façade was built at the far end of the courtyard. After the castle was acquired by the Luxembourg State in 1968, the buildings were fully restored and, in 1982, opened for exhibitions, concerts, meetings and receptions.

The castle' s three banqueting halls with facilities for up to 200 people offer venues for business meetings, gala dinners and cultural events. La Distillerie, a restaurant on the castle premises, is considered to be one of the best in Luxembourg.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Moritz (9 months ago)
Great experience! Also awesome for vegans! You come in and get overthrown with starters one more delicious then the other. Especially great is how they incorporate plants from the local forest into each plate and then hear the chef explaining how the plants with you body is just great. The rest of the service was also super nice and made us feel there super welcome. Menu could be easily made vegan just ask them ;)
Claudia Adam (11 months ago)
All the food was amazingly good and well presented, the staff was very professional, the chef was very nice and very friendly, except the sir that answered me the phone and that welcomed me at the door, he was extremely rude and surprise surprise, for the best vegetable restaurant in the world they don't speak English. But besides that everything was just amazing I can't even describe, is like watching a beautiful dance, the flavours were just out of this world and I definitely will return ❤ if you want to have a very good experience and taste explendid food please come here, I'm sure you will pass a wonderful time ? I hope you enjoy this beautiful dishes cause in real life you will enjoy so much more ?
CM A (13 months ago)
I've visited the bistro, a distended version of the main Michelin starred restaurant. Whilst the menu, in general, fulfilled my expectations, the ambience, more than distended was, in many aspects, sloppy.
Colette Schmit (13 months ago)
Wonderful experience, worth every cent.
Rolf Steiner (14 months ago)
Cute small distillery. Huge choice of products
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Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.