Basilica of St. Plechelm

Oldenzaal, Netherlands

The basilica of St. Plechelm is a Roman Catholic church dedicated to the 8th-century Irish monk Saint Plechelm, whose festival on 15 July has been on the calendar of the medieval diocese of Utrecht ever since his canonisation in the 10th century.

The oldest parts of the existing building date from the middle and the second half of the 12th century, but the history of the church goes back to the 8th century, when the traveling missionary Plechelmus founded the first church on the site, the Silvesterkerk, initially dedicated to pope Silvester and sometime before 954 rededicated to Plechelmus himself (canonised after the elevation of his relics).

In 954, bishop Balderik of Utrecht founded a chapter in Oldenzaal and expanded and restored the 8th-century church, allowing the relics of Plechelmus used on his canonisation to be transferred to it. The current tower was erected around 1240. The church was enlarged in Gothic style in 1480s.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: c. 1150
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iris Grunder (7 months ago)
Prachtige basiliek,zeker een bezoek waard.En je kunt de toren beklimmen met als beloning een prachtig uitzicht over Oldenzaal en omstreken.Doen dus!!
San Evertman (7 months ago)
Geweldige stal met lieve mensen. Stal eigenaar heeft een hart van goud voor de paarden
Jacob Pol (8 months ago)
Werkelijk schitterend. De mooiste baseliek in de verre omtrek en een omweg waard!
Gerard Kraesgenberg (8 months ago)
Het was een trieste aangelegenheid... We hadden een avondwake.
Jos Lansink (19 months ago)
The place to be
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.