The beautiful water castle of Gemen near Borken was founded probably in the 9th or 10th century. The first document dates from 1274. The current appearance is a result of five essential reconstruction phases. Since 1946, the castle has been used as a youth camp under the guidance of the diocese of Münster.

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HANNELORE GENSEMEYER (KREMER) said 14 days ago
I SPEND A FEW NIGHTS ABOUT 60 YEARS AGO, UNFORGETTABE.


Address

Freiheit 24, Borken, Germany
See all sites in Borken

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.borken.de

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Georg Sporkmann (5 months ago)
Die Burg Gemen in Borken ist sicherlich eine der außergewöhnlichsten Burgen im Münsterland. Strahlend hell glänzt das Gemäuer in der Sonne. Die mehr als 900 Jahre alte Burg Gemen wird von einer mächtigen Gräfte umgeben, deren Umrundung wunderbare verschiedene Perspektiven auf das Bauwerk eröffnet.
Lara.47 (8 months ago)
ich war dort mit meiner Konfi gruppe und hatte 2 wunderschöne Tage die Zimmer sind sehr schön die Betten sehr gemütlich
Castle Biker (14 months ago)
Grote waterburcht waar je gratis omheen kunt wandelen. Ook het parkeren op de parkeerplaats er tegen over was toen ik er was gratis. Het zou een gigantisch mooie burcht kunnen zijn, maar van dichtbij valt het op sommige punten toch tegen. Door bijvoorbeeld de witte kozijnen en de achterkant die niet echt in stijl is opgeknapt. Toch krijgt de burcht 5 sterren, omdat het publiek er omheen kan wandelen en het voor de regio toch een vrij unieke burcht is.
Bernd Feldhaus (19 months ago)
Standard
Bernd Wesseler (20 months ago)
Lise-meintner-stasse 11a
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Hochosterwitz Castle

Hochosterwitz Castle is considered to be one of Austria's most impressive medieval castles. The rock castle is one of the state's landmarks and a major tourist attraction.

The site was first mentioned in an 860 deed issued by King Louis the German of East Francia, donating several of his properties in the former Principality of Carantania to the Archdiocese of Salzburg. In the 11th century Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg ceded the castle to the Dukes of Carinthia from the noble House of Sponheim in return for their support during the Investiture Controversy. The Sponheim dukes bestowed the fiefdom upon the family of Osterwitz, who held the hereditary office of the cup-bearer in 1209.

In the 15th century, the last Carinthian cup-bearer, Georg of Osterwitz was captured in a Turkish invasion and died in 1476 in prison without leaving descendants. So after four centuries, on 30 May 1478, the possession of the castle reverted to Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg.

Over the next 30 years, the castle was badly damaged by numerous Turkish campaigns. On 5 October 1509, Emperor Maximilian I handed the castle as a pledge to Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, then Bishop of Gurk. Bishop Lang undertook a substantial renovation project for the damaged castle.

About 1541, German king Ferdinand I of Habsburg bestowed Hochosterwitz upon the Carinthian governor Christof Khevenhüller. In 1571, Baron George Khevenhüller acquired the citadel by purchase. He fortified to deal with the threat of Turkish invasions of the region, building an armory and 14 gates between 1570 and 1586. Such massive fortification is considered unique in citadel construction.

Since the 16th century, no major changes have been made to Hochosterwitz. It has also remained in the possession of the Khevenhüller family as requested by the original builder, George Khevenhüller. A marble plaque dating from 1576 in the castle yard documents this request.

A specific feature is the access way to the castle passing through a total of 14 gates, which are particularly prominent owing to the castle's situation in the landscape. Tourists are allowed to walk the 620-metre long pathway through the gates up to the castle; each gate has a diagram of the defense mechanism used to seal that particular gate. The castle rooms hold a collection of prehistoric artifacts, paintings, weapons, and armor, including one set of armor 2.4 metres tall, once worn by Burghauptmann Schenk.