K. H Renlund Museum

Kokkola, Finland

The cultural heritage of Kokkola is displayed in the K. H. Renlund Museum. It is located in the former school built in 1696. It is one of the oldest wooden buildings in Finland.

Alongside exhibitions, the museum offers an extensive range of educational programmes encompassing a wide audience. The courtyard in the Museum Quarter is an oasis during the summer, a pleasant place where you can sit and enjoy refreshments in historical surroundings before or after a tour of the museum. Many diverse exhibitions are to be found at Roos House, Pedagogy, Lassander House and Exhibition Hall. Visits to Drake House, the private residence of Fredrik and Anna Drake now a museum open to the public, and Leo Torppa’s Camera Collection can be visited by appointment.

Reference: The city of Kokkola

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details


Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paula Pajala (2 years ago)
En muista muuta museota kuin Oulun reissulla poikettiin en nyt muista minkä niminen se oli. Kaikenlaisia maitokannuja satoja kappaleita ja vanhaa asutusta.
Sisko Väisänen (2 years ago)
Mainiot näyttelyt ja aivan uskomattoman hyvä palvelu koko Museossa ja etenkin Museokaupassa!
Matti Uimonen (2 years ago)
+ opas
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Erittäin hieno museo kokonaisuudessaan vaikka sisältö ei täysin sovi omaan pirtaan koskien näyttelyn sisältöä 2017 Kuitenkin täysin tutustumisen arvoinen museo, jopa ulkokuoreltaan.
Markus Hyytinen (3 years ago)
Kokkolan Roosintalo koostuu K.H. Renlundin lahjoittamasta taidekokoelmasta jonka hän on lahjoittanut Roosintalolle jossa yläkerrassa voi käydä katsomassa hänen lahjoittaamaa taulukokoelmaa jossa on myös taulukuvia kaikista Roosintalon perheen jäsenistä ja ihmisistä Roosintalon sydämmen muodostaa tämä lahjoituskokoelma ja Roosinperheen Muistot
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.