K. H Renlund Museum

Kokkola, Finland

The cultural heritage of Kokkola is displayed in the K. H. Renlund Museum. It is located in the former school built in 1696. It is one of the oldest wooden buildings in Finland.

Alongside exhibitions, the museum offers an extensive range of educational programmes encompassing a wide audience. The courtyard in the Museum Quarter is an oasis during the summer, a pleasant place where you can sit and enjoy refreshments in historical surroundings before or after a tour of the museum. Many diverse exhibitions are to be found at Roos House, Pedagogy, Lassander House and Exhibition Hall. Visits to Drake House, the private residence of Fredrik and Anna Drake now a museum open to the public, and Leo Torppa’s Camera Collection can be visited by appointment.

Reference: The city of Kokkola

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Category: Museums in Finland

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paula Pajala (8 months ago)
En muista muuta museota kuin Oulun reissulla poikettiin en nyt muista minkä niminen se oli. Kaikenlaisia maitokannuja satoja kappaleita ja vanhaa asutusta.
Sisko Väisänen (10 months ago)
Mainiot näyttelyt ja aivan uskomattoman hyvä palvelu koko Museossa ja etenkin Museokaupassa!
Matti Uimonen (11 months ago)
+ opas
Jari Sundman (16 months ago)
Erittäin hieno museo kokonaisuudessaan vaikka sisältö ei täysin sovi omaan pirtaan koskien näyttelyn sisältöä 2017 Kuitenkin täysin tutustumisen arvoinen museo, jopa ulkokuoreltaan.
Markus Hyytinen (2 years ago)
Kokkolan Roosintalo koostuu K.H. Renlundin lahjoittamasta taidekokoelmasta jonka hän on lahjoittanut Roosintalolle jossa yläkerrassa voi käydä katsomassa hänen lahjoittaamaa taulukokoelmaa jossa on myös taulukuvia kaikista Roosintalon perheen jäsenistä ja ihmisistä Roosintalon sydämmen muodostaa tämä lahjoituskokoelma ja Roosinperheen Muistot
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