Kaarlela Church

Kokkola, Finland

Kaarlela church was built around years 1500-1530. It was modified to the present cross shape during the 18th century by local vicar Anders Chydenius. One of the oldest pulpits in Finland is placed inside the church. It was brought from Sweden by vicar Jacob Skepperus in 1622.

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Malloy said 7 years ago
It was encouraging visiting the church and the Museum as student 0n 6th October, 2012. Its history and activities are a learning experience to building christian faith and salvation. God bless His people and be us always. I hope to visit you again.


Details

Founded: 1500-1530
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko M (11 months ago)
Hieno noin 1460-luvulla rakennettu keskiaikainen kivikirkko, joka myöhempinä vuosisatoina on laajennettu ristikirkoksi.
Jens Strom (13 months ago)
Fin gammal kyrka
Niko Enna (14 months ago)
Beautiful church from near the beginning of Finland's Christianization.
Paavo Ylönen (2 years ago)
Tunnelmallinen.
Gabriel Balsa (4 years ago)
A good place
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