Jasenov Castle Ruins

Jasenov, Slovakia

At the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries Jasenov castle belonged to the noble man Peter from Bačkov. He was formerly an ally of the king, Charles Robert, during the period of struggle with the family of Omodejs (of the Abov county). Later, because Peter turned agains the king and tried to murder him, his property was thus entirely confiscated and in 1317 most of it given to the faithful Philip Drugeth. Since then it was owned continously by the Drugeths, still their’s even in the 17th century as a part of the the domain of castles Brekov and Jasenov.

The first written document mentions the castle in the 1320s. The geographical position of the castle, built in the mountains away from the main provincial road was suitable for the function of a noble lord‘s seat. The nearby Brekov served the more typical purpose of a guard castle in the service of defending the local land or accomodating the king on his travels. George I Rákoczi’s army conquered and destroyed the Jasenov castle in 1644, during the third great uprising against the Habsburg empire. After the initiative of Count Andrássy, the vanishing ruin of the castle was partly conserved, several objects were roofed and the entrance part was fixed during the beginning of the 20th century. Today, however, only ruins remain.

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Jasenov, Slovakia
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kevin Richter (2 years ago)
This is very beautiful old castle. It is currently being repaired, but there is still a lot to see. The view from the castle is astonishing. There are three possible ways to the castle you can take. Red, blue and yellow. Red one is the longest and leads through the meadow following by forestry road. Blue one is the shortest but most difficult through the forest and yellow one is gravel road made probably by builders repairing the castle. It is also most suitable for most tourists.
Martin Cizmar (2 years ago)
Impressive castle walls
Rastislav Wölcz (2 years ago)
A nice castle (or better said a ruined castle) with very nice view at Humenné and its surroundings.
Ales Misura (2 years ago)
Beautiful view and calm place.
Barka Kacenakova (3 years ago)
Easy hike, nice place
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