St. Michael Archangel's Church

Turzańsk, Poland

St. Michael Archangel's Church in Turzańsk together with different tserkvas is designated as part of the UNESCO Wooden tserkvas of the Carpathian region in Poland and Ukraine.

The tserkva in Turzańsk, established as an Eastern Orthodox Church tsekva, later Uniate, was referenced in the first half of the sixteenth-century. The present tserkva was built at the start of the nineteenth-century in 1801, and later expanded in 1836, with a foyer and sacristy. In 1896 and 1913, the tserkva had undergone renovations of its roof, strengthening it with tin. After displacing the Ukrainian populous from the area, as part of Operation Vistula, the tserkva was used by Roman Catholics, between 1947 and 1961. In 1963, the tserkva was returned to the Polish Orthodox Church. The interior of the tserkva exhibits original components: iconostasis from 1895, and a polychrome from the turning point of the nineteenth and twentieth-century.

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Founded: 1801
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kinga Rogowska (13 months ago)
Piękna cerkiew, ale ostatnio w remoncie. Z zewnątrz niewiele widać, wnętrze naprawdę stare, czuć ducha historii. Ksiądz co prawda opowiada o cerkwi, ale robotnicy nie przerywają walenia młotkami i cięcia piłami, zatem nic nie słychać. Szkoda.
bartorzel (14 months ago)
Beautiful. A must-see. Exterior under renovation.
Oldřiška Zahradníková (14 months ago)
A beautiful monument, but unfortunately at the time of the visit under scaffolding
Gosia Wojewoda (15 months ago)
Something amazing. I recommend it to everyone. At the moment, the exterior is undergoing renovation but the interior is still open. The stories of the person taking care of the church and the reconstruction are amazing. Thank you.
victòria Molina (16 months ago)
The wooden architectonic route, churches mainly. Unesco heritage, marvellous
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