Lenin's Mausoleum

Moscow, Russia

Lenin's Mausoleum serves as the current resting place of Vladimir Lenin. His embalmed body has been on public display there since shortly after his death in 1924 (with rare exceptions in wartime). Aleksey Shchusev's diminutive but monumental granite structure incorporates some elements from ancient mausoleums, such as the Step Pyramid and the Tomb of Cyrus the Great.

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Details

Founded: 1924
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Russia

More Information

www.moscow.info

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pavan Rao (20 months ago)
A must do when in Moscow especially if you have an interest in history. Just takes one back in time. Just amazed to see it finally. Doesn't feel eerie. Very respectful place. The staff inside are mild and friendly and they urge you on and not stay too long. I was the only one there when I went in. The surrounding important stones are worth the time too after this.
Quentin Macaque (20 months ago)
Unforgettable experience of the old USSR. Monolithic mausoleum. Lenin - the progenitor of a world of suffering. But don't go if history is not your bag. If you DO plan to go then be aware that the mausoleum has very limited opening hours.
Rajesh Kamath (20 months ago)
Wonderful experience to see Lenin's bodily remains. Had heard a lot about him, but by visiting this place, you go through the memories of Soviet Union. It is a different experience. The security is very strict and no photos allowed inside. Seeing the busts of other Heads of State during Soviet times, reminds us about tolerance of Russians.
Billy Lingard (21 months ago)
Very much enjoyed the experience. Was good to see the man in charge for the revolution in real life. Not something you expect and no matter how many pictures you see it’s not the same as real life.
J.J. M. (2 years ago)
A spectacular and wonderful experience. This is one of the things that you should and absolutely must see should you ever find yourself visiting Moscow. The staff are particularly strict and run a tight ship, so don't push your luck or do anything that would upset them.
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