The abbey of Vaucelles, old Cistercian abbey founded in 1132 by Saint-Bernard, is the 13th daughter-house of Clairvaux. During the era of prosperity in the 12th and 13th centuries, the community included several hundred monks, lay brothers and novices. The 12th century claustral building is the only remains of this immense abbey, now open to the public. It included the Norman scriptorium, auditorium, chapter room (built in 1170). Vaucelles is the largest Cistercian chapter room in Europe and the acoustics are exceptional. The Sacred Passage where the remains of the first three abbots of Vaucelles, canonized by Pope Alexander III in 1179, are buried.

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Founded: 1132
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marie Danslenord (7 months ago)
Nice visit, warm welcome. The garden is very peaceful and beautiful even in October. It's just a shame that the site is less accessible for people in wheelchairs or with a stroller.
Chatane черные мечты (7 months ago)
I have known this abbey for about 25 years, I took the children to the Christmas market ... Older, I made them discover history, and today, I still go there for the pleasure of taking pictures. The welcome is very friendly, the gardens magnificent, it is a pleasure to return each time. Everything is very clean, and very well maintained. Impeccable toilets Parking right in front I recommend...
Genevieve Richez (8 months ago)
Very nice place..but short visit and no refreshment bar ... luckily the garden is there to add part of the visit and there is a brewery which will apparently soon open next door which will produce its own beer ... so promising for more things in the future
Rosa van der Ven (2 years ago)
Nice place to walk around (and cool down during a hot day), the place has a great garden where you could also sit down and enjoy the plants for a while. You can buy drinks at the entrance and they also have booklets in different languages with information about the place.
Jose Bettiol (2 years ago)
Abbaye située entre Saint Quentin et Cambrai. Un grand parc et plusieurs expositions chaque année. Premier dimanche de novembre messe de la saint Hubert avec les sonneurs de cor et rallye équestre après bénédiction des chevaux et des chiens présents avec à disposition du public des morceaux de pain béni
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