Amusement Palace

Moscow, Russia

The Amusement Palace is located at the Kremlin’s western wall. It is situated between the Commandant and Trinity Towers. It was built in 1652 for Ilya Miloslavsky, who was the father-in-law of czar Alexei Mikhailovich. After the death of Miloslavsky, the palace went to the state. It was then used as a theatre. In the theatre performances were staged to amuse the family of the czar and his court. Hence, it got the name the Amusement Palace.

During the administration of czar Peter the Great, the Police Department was placed in the Palace. In the 19th century the Commandant of Moscow took up his residence there. The palace was restored in 2002-2004, including the original décor of its façade and the Church of our Lady’s Glorification.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1652
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chandler Ponders (2 years ago)
so fun that i was poisoned the next day
Lilia Faizova (2 years ago)
Сюда не просто попасть. Если если возможность это сделать, обязательно сделайте. Весь комплекс - поразительного сочетание роскоши, вкуса, старины и истории
Don Cook (2 years ago)
Кирилл Патин (3 years ago)
Отличный вид. Все прекрасно и величественно в Московском Кремле.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.