Granitz Hunting Lodge

Binz, Germany

Granitz Hunting Lodge lies in the middle of the forested Granitz ridge which covers an area of about 1,000 hectares and has been part of the Southeast Rügen Biosphere Reserve since 1991. The name Tempelberg given to the highest hill in the Granitz comes from the 18th century, when a small hexagonal belvedere stood on the site of the present schloss.

The hunting lodge was built between 1838 to 1846 by order of Prince Wilhelm Malte I of Putbus, based on a design by Berlin architect, Johann Gottfried Steinmeyer in the style of the North Italian Renaissance castellos. It was once a popular holiday destination for European nobility and prominent people; for example, Frederick William IV, Christian VIII, Otto von Bismarck, Elizabeth von Arnim, and Johann Jacob Grümbke numbered amongst its visitors.

The lodge was owned by the von Putbus family until 1944 and passed into Nazi hands on the imprisonment of Malte von Putbus. The family was finally dispossessed as part of the East German land reforms and the castle remains today in state hands. After the end of the Second World War many of the furnishings were lost or stolen, several works of art were taken to the Berlin Art Depot, the agency for the administration of Soviet assets in Germany, and transferred in 1953 to the state museums in Berlin.

Attempts by the grandson of Malte zu Putbus, Franz zu Putbus, to get the family seat returned failed in court. The building is used today as a museum. The castle was renovated at the beginning of the 21st century at a cost of 7.9 million euros.

The two storey, plastered, brick edifice has a rectangular ground plan and four small corner towers. In the centre of the building in the old courtroom there is a 38 metre high central tower, erected later based on plans by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Inside is a cantilevered circular staircase with 154 cast iron steps. The static forces of the heavy iron staircase are entirely absorbed by the side walls; because it virtually clamped to the tower.

From the observation platform, 145 metres above sea level (NN), on the roof of the tower, there is a panoramic view in all directions, especially over the south and east of Rügen. In clear visibility the island of Usedom may be seen.

Old hunting rifles are displayed in the 'Stags of the World' (Hirsche der Welt) exhibition as well as furniture from the 19th century. In addition there are temporary exhibitions, for example of paintings.

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Details

Founded: 1838-1846
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

aaldert duister (12 months ago)
Nice lodge , only the main tower to the top is closed because of the covid 19 so you cant go to the roof of the high vieuw tower.wat was a little sad.
Seculici Veronica (12 months ago)
The road there is a bit long, almost 2 km in the forest. The tower was closed when we were there and that what i wanted to see. Parking is 2 euro pro hour. Near the castle is a station for the old train.
minu balakrishna (13 months ago)
The trail is beautiful. It takes around 700m from the parking near Imbiss. There are two cafes to sit and relax and enjoy the nature.
Lucas Dürksen (13 months ago)
The area around this castle ist beautiful to walk through. There you have the castle, a big oak, playground, museum and of course some restaurant to prevent getting hungry. It’s a really clean and tidy place and from my point of view a must seen attraction. I’ve you’re lucky enough to spot the old train power by steam engine, this could be your highlight. To avoid walking to the castle on you own you can also use this kind of hop-on-hop-off sight seeing train. Or if your the more sportive guy, then take the bike. It’s fun to ride there.
Lucas Dürksen (13 months ago)
The area around this castle ist beautiful to walk through. There you have the castle, a big oak, playground, museum and of course some restaurant to prevent getting hungry. It’s a really clean and tidy place and from my point of view a must seen attraction. I’ve you’re lucky enough to spot the old train power by steam engine, this could be your highlight. To avoid walking to the castle on you own you can also use this kind of hop-on-hop-off sight seeing train. Or if your the more sportive guy, then take the bike. It’s fun to ride there.
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